Susan plays the piano more than watches TV.

< Previous | Next >

shorty1

Senior Member
Korean
Hello people.


I made up the sentences to see if it is ok to omit the repeated subject 'Susan'.

#1. Susan plays the piano more than she watches TV.
#2. Susan plays the piano more than watching TV.
#3. Susan plays the piano more than watches TV.

I assume that all the sentences would be ok.
My thought is right?


Thank you for your help. :)
 
  • Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hullo, shorty1.

    You can look at it this way:

    Matrix: Susan plays the piano
    Insert: Susan watches TV
    Result: Susan plays the piano more than Susan watches TV ——> Susan plays the piano more than she watches TV

    Matrix: Susan eats sweets
    Insert: Susan eats burgers
    Result: Susan eats more sweets than Susan eats burgers ——> Susan eats more sweets than she eats burgers ——> Susan eats more sweets than she does burgers
    ——> Susan eats more sweets than burgers

    Matrix: Susan eats sweets
    Insert: I drink whiskeys
    Result: Susan eats more sweets than I drink whiskeys

    Matrix: He has influence
    Insert: She has money
    Result: He has more influence than she has money

    etc.

    Best.

    GS
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, Giorgio. Your example does not explain why she cannot be omitted in 'Susan plays the piano more than she watches TV', whereas it can in 'Susan eats more sweets than she eats burgers. I only know that it sounds wrong if 'she' is omitted.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you so much Giorgio and natkretep for your help.

    Let me take another example with a different construction.
    "He would more readily pay the fine than appeal to a higher court." (a comprehensive grammar of the english language)

    In the above sentence, 'more' is put before the adverb 'readily' in front of 'pay'.
    Also in this case, the repeated part 'he would' seems to be omitted before the verb 'appeal'... I have no idea why 'he would' is omitted.
    What am I overlooking now?
     
    Last edited:

    AquisM

    Senior Member
    English/Cantonese
    Thank you so much Giorgio and natkretep for your help.

    Let me take another example with a different construction.
    "He would more readily pay the fine than appeal to a higher court." (a comprehensive grammar of the english language)

    In the above sentence, 'more' is put before the verb 'pay'.
    Also in this case, the repeated part 'he would' seems to be omitted before the verb 'appeal'... I have no idea why 'he would' is omitted.
    What am I overlooking now?
    In this sentence, the more is not modifying pay, but readily, thus it is put in front of readily. As for the second question, I don't have an explanation as to why you can omit the subject here, but not in the first example. It's just the way the language works. I hope someone else can give you the answer :)
     

    gvergara

    Senior Member
    Español
    Yes, Giorgio. Your example does not explain why she cannot be omitted in 'Susan plays the piano more than she watches TV', whereas it can in 'Susan eats more sweets than she eats burgers. I only know that it sounds wrong if 'she' is omitted.
    The subject and verb phrase are the same on both sides. That's what accounts for the fact that in some cases you can omit the subject, whereas that's not possible in others. For the same reason he would has been omitted in your last sentence, shorty1. Similarly, you say I like pizza and pasta and not I like pizza and I like pasta, see? Cheers

    G.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you so much AquisM and gvergara.
    I get it. :)

    Like the subject and the verb, 'the subject and the modal verb' can be omitted when they are repeated and, of course, that is optional.
     

    ribran

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Is it a frequency vs. number/amount issue?

    Susan plays the piano more than watches TV. :cross:
    In Austin, more people walk to work than drive Ferraris. :tick:
    More money falls out of pockets than goes to charity. :tick:
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Is it a frequency vs. number/amount issue?

    Susan plays the piano more than watches TV. :cross:
    In Austin, more people walk to work than drive Ferraris. :tick:
    More money falls out of pockets than goes to charity. :tick:

    Great examples. :thumbsup:

    Yes, they are right.

    By the way, in your examples the omitting of the subject after 'than' is compulsory, not optional.
    That would be why 'than' is like a relative pronoun in some cases like your examples.


    Thank you for reminding me of it.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top