Svetozar

EuropeanOrigin

Member
English NZ & Australia
Is there a Slavic meaning for this name? The first part "sveto" looks Slavic but what about the "zar"? Are there other Slavic names which end in this way?
 
  • Azori

    Senior Member
    Some online Slovak sources explain its meaning (using Slovak vocabulary) as - "svetelná žiara"

    svetelná (adj.) = light, luminous, photic
    žiara (n.) = blaze, glare, flare

    Not sure if this is correct.
     

    igusarov

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Is there a Slavic meaning for this name? The first part "sveto" looks Slavic but what about the "zar"? Are there other Slavic names which end in this way?
    "Zar" looks slavic too. Russian sources interpret the name as "озаряющий светом" (word order is not important) which could be explained as "the one who radiates light on those around him".
    Other similar slavic names are Велизар (Velizar), Лучезар (Lachezar).

    I think Azori's interpretation is also possible, because that "zar" part could have come from several different words.
     

    DarkChild

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    "Zar" looks slavic too. Russian sources interpret the name as "озаряющий светом" (word order is not important) which could be explained as "the one who radiates light on those around him".
    Other similar slavic names are Велизар (Velizar), Лучезар (Lachezar).

    I think Azori's interpretation is also possible, because that "zar" part could have come from several different words.

    This is a common name in Bulgarian, along with its variant Светлозар. Велизар and Лъчезар are widely-used too. I didn't know they existed in other languages as I don't remember seeing the –zar ending in foreign names, unlike -slav, -mir, and other similar endings.
     

    Azori

    Senior Member
    This is a common name in Bulgarian, along with its variant Светлозар. Велизар and Лъчезар are widely-used too. I didn't know they existed in other languages as I don't remember seeing the –zar ending in foreign names, unlike -slav, -mir, and other similar endings.
    In Slovakia, Svetozár is a rather rare name. I met only one so far. I don't know of any other names of Slavic origin with an ending -zar/-zár in Slovak (the Slovak name day calendar doesn't seem to have any except for "Svetozár").
     
    Велизар is probably not related to Лъчезар/Лучезар and Светозар, since it seems to be derived from Belisarius/Βελισάριος, although it might have been re-interpreted as Slavic due to folk etymology.

    It could be useful to know how old are these names exactly, because they strike me as somewhat artificial and not in accordance with the old Slavic onomastikon; there's a possibility they are relatively recent compounds. Alas, I can't find anything reliable on the subject.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Велизар is probably not related to Лъчезар/Лучезар and Светозар, since it seems to be derived from Belisarius/Βελισάριος, although it might have been re-interpreted as Slavic due to folk etymology.

    It could be useful to know how old are these names exactly, because they strike me as somewhat artificial and not in accordance with the old Slavic onomastikon; there's a possibility they are relatively recent compounds. Alas, I can't find anything reliable on the subject.
    Can't the "zar" part be related to the word "zreti" (to see)?
     
    Can't the "zar" part be related to the word "zreti" (to see)?

    It seems to be derived from *zarja 'blaze, shining', which is indeed related to *zьrěti 'to see', and this is what bothers me, along with the semantics - I can't think of any other names like that amongst Slavs. I would expect names with meanings like "radiant" in, say, Iranic or Indian context, but they look odd compared to other old Slavic compound names.
     

    EuropeanOrigin

    Member
    English NZ & Australia
    killevippen said:
    Велизар is probably not related to Лъчезар/Лучезар and Светозар, since it seems to be derived from Belisarius/Βελισάριος, although it might have been re-interpreted as Slavic due to folk etymology.
    Is there a Latin or Greek meaning for Belisarius or are there other similar names in those languages?
     
    You have only one element in common свет = lux, there is no equivalent of Latin fero, but a repetition of lux (or video) in zar.
    I'd rather interpret this zor-/zar- as "radiate, shine", though I'm not sure if it is a verbal root (озарить "illuminate" is denominal). There is also лучезарный with луч etymologically related to lūx. But I didn't mean that светозарный is a calque from Greek/Latin: it just has the similar meaning (back to the topic question).
     

    Gvozden

    New Member
    Serbian
    It's a Serbian name of Slavic origin. It comes from the verb:

    "ozariti, ozariti se" = "obasjati, obasjati se" also "odobrovoljiti se, oraspoložiti se"... = "to light up" also "to cheer up"... (there is similar word with different meaning "ožariti = to burn, to sting")

    and name also adj:
    "svet, sveti/a/o" = "world, holy"
    Both the verb and the name are of Slavic origin.

    The meaning of the name is:
    Svetozar = "The one who light up the world" or "the one who cheer up the world"...

    Examples of famous Serbs:
    Svetozar Markovic Serbian political activist, Svetozar Miletic political leader of Serbs in Vojvodina etc.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    It's a Serbian name of Slavic origin. It comes from the verb:

    "ozariti, ozariti se" = "obasjati, obasjati se" also "odobrovoljiti se, oraspoložiti se"... = "to light up" also "to cheer up"... (there is similar word with different meaning "ožariti = to burn, to sting")

    and name also adj:
    "svet, sveti/a/o" = "world, holy"
    Both the verb and the name are of Slavic origin.

    The meaning of the name is:
    Svetozar = "The one who light up the world" or "the one who cheer up the world"...

    Examples of famous Serbs:
    Svetozar Markovic Serbian political activist, Svetozar Miletic political leader of Serbs in Vojvodina etc.

    How old is this name? Are you sure that "svet" meant "saint" at the time the name was coined? What about other meanings of "svet" in Slavic?
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    In my dialect Svet has three meanings:

    1/ World - po tsel svet
    2/ Saint - Sveti/Sveta/Svetnik/Svetnici
    3/ Shine - Sveti/Svetlina

    Meaning 1 and 3 occur in all modern Slavic languages with a very similar phonetic form.
    Meaning 2 “saint” differs more, e.g. it is święty in Polish and svjatyj in Russian (свѧтъ [svɛ̃t] or [svɔ̃t], in OCS).

    But the point is what Svet meant when the name was coined. If it was 1500 years ago then your information does not bring us closer to the solution, as we still don’t know how the name was pronounced at that time ad which of the meanings was intended.
     
    I'd like to humbly draw attention to what has been written in ##11 & 14. In Russian, there exists an adjective светозарный. The light (свет) may illuminate (озарить) something, e. g. the lyrics of the Russian variant of "Esmeralda" from "Notre-Dame de Paris" begins with Свет озарил мою больную душу… "The light has illuminated my ill soul…".
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I'd like to humbly draw attention to what has been written in ##11 & 14. In Russian, there exists an adjective светозарный. The light (свет) may illuminate (озарить) something, e. g. the lyrics of the Russian variant of "Esmeralda" from "Notre-Dame de Paris" begins with Свет озарил мою больную душу… "The light has illuminated my ill soul…".
    Well, the discussion continues due (among other) to claims that Svetozar is a Serbian name and the svet element in it means "holy" (which I personally doubt). Nobody has, so far contended your information.
     
    It seems that many Serbians believe that Svet in the name means holy.
    I would compare it to the mess with the name Vladimir. Judging from the vacillation -merъ/-měrъ/-mirъ in the ancient texts, this name was a Slavic adaptation of the Gothic *Waldamer(s) "glorious through power" (translated at the same time to Slavic as *Waldeislāwas > Vladislavъ etc.), but in some languages (like Russian) the second part of the name has been associated with mirъ "world" with a respective change in the perceived meaning.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    My apologies Ben Jamin

    But, I believe that the name Svetozar would be a derivative of number 2.

    The name probably meant "Saintly"...but I am only speculating...
    No apologies rquired. Everybody has his right to believe things.
    But have you got any stronger arguments than your belief? Any old texts that confirm your hypethesis? Any linguistic analyses taking account of the epoch the name was created, and the language development from that time until now?
     

    Christo Tamarin

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Bulgarian or Russian could give the clue. Unfortunately, they do not.

    If Svet- in Svetozar/Светозар means holy, then we might have Svjatozar/Святозар in Russian.

    If Svet- in Svetozar means radiant, then we might have Sve:tozar/Свѣтозар in Bulgarian before 1945 (in 1945 the letters ѣ and ѫ were banned by the communists).
     
    Bulgarian or Russian could give the clue. Unfortunately, they do not.

    If Svet- in Svetozar/Светозар means holy, then we might have Svjatozar/Святозар in Russian.

    If Svet- in Svetozar means radiant, then we might have Sve:tozar/Свѣтозар in Bulgarian before 1945 (in 1945 the letters ѣ and ѫ were banned by the communists).
    Is this enough: https://books.google.ru/books?id=ET...d=0CB8Q6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=свѣтозарный&f=false ?
     

    LD aid

    New Member
    Hebrew
    Svet could be “saint”, “world”, “light”
    Zar could be “lighting”, “see/observe”, “tsar/king”
    So there are 9 possible permutation of what Svetozar may mean or was intended to mean.

    Then you have “Mir“ which in Bulgarian means “peace“ while in Russian it means “world”.
    Slav is straightforward - “glory”
    Lyubo is from “love”
    Rado comes from “joy”
    Veli from “velik“ or “great”
    Lyud is “people”
    Mil mean “dear”
    Bozhi means “from God”
    Dar is “gift”
    Dobro means “good”
    Bog is “god”, etc...


    so you can literally come up with hundreds of permutations of valid names, Svetomir, Radislav, Radmila, Bogoslav, Dobrolyub, Slavolyub, Bogomil, Bozhidar, Lyudmila.......
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Svet could be “saint”, “world”, “light”
    It will be "saint" (or rather "holy") only in those languages where *ę has coincided with *e. Cf. Rus. svyatóy "holy", "saint", "sacred" vs. svét "(a) light"; "world" (in East Slavic languages the vowels didn't coincide). It basically has been covered above already.
    Zar could be “lighting”, “see/observe”, “tsar/king”
    "Zar" cannot be "king". German uses "z" for "Zar" simply because the "z" letter means the affricate /ts/ in it. Slavic languages have only /ts/ here, not /z/ phonetically.
    It doesn't seem that Slavic languages can have "zar" as something directly related to seeing either (the main P-Sl. roots here are *-zьr- > *-zir- and *-zor-), although "-zar-" (generally related to shining; cf. Rus. zaryá "dawn") is believed to be remotely related.

    Actually the morphology of "Svetozar" is quite transparent.
     
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