sway your swag

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marcbatco

Senior Member
Italian-Italy
Hi, I would like to ask you which is the meaning if the expression in bold in the following:
A cool steel-blue suit would be right at home next to your date's silk rust wrap dress, but don't let us sway your swag.
 
  • WestSideGal

    Senior Member
    English, US
    "Don't let us steer you away from your own personal style/coolness". Swag is just modern jargon for "cool".
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    "Don't let us steer you away from your own personal style/coolness". Swag is just modern jargon for "cool".
    Hi WestSideGal, and thank you for your reply. The context is the suggested attire for a wedding. And, how is the expression related to at home next to your date's ...?
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    We think this suit goes well with the dress that your date picked out, but you shouldn't pick it just because we said so.
     

    WestSideGal

    Senior Member
    English, US
    Hi WestSideGal, and thank you for your reply. The context is the suggested attire for a wedding. And, how is the expression related to at home next to your date's ...?
    It means that the steel blue suit would go perfectly with your date’s dress, that together you both would be the picture of style. I’m exaggerating but I find the wording in fashion magazines to be a little much.;);)
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    We think this suit goes well with the dress that your date picked out, but you shouldn't pick it just because we said so.
    It means that the steel blue suit would go perfectly with your date’s dress, that together you both would be the picture of style. I’m exaggerating but I find the wording in fashion magazines to be a little much.;);)
    Thank you, Myridon and WestSideGal. I only do not understand why the expression at home is used? Is it idiomatic?
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    Thank you, Myridon and WestSideGal. I only do not understand why the expression at home is used? Is it idiomatic?
    Yes, 'at home' is definitely idiomatic. In this context it means that the suit and the dress complement each other in an aesthetic sense; steel blue and rust orange look good together.
     
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