Sweden

robbie_SWE

Senior Member
Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
I believe that in most languages, my country starts with "S", but there must be exceptions. I seem to remember that the Finnish word starts with "R". So, how do you say Sweden in your language?

Swedish: Sverige
German: Schweden
Romanian: Suedia
French: Suède
Italian: Svezia



:) robbie
 
  • linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    In Urdu, we borrow the English: سويڈن (Sweedan)
    In Gujarati, we borrow the English too: સ્વીડન (Sweedan)
    In Hindi, again from the English: स्वीडन (Sweedan)
    In Punjabi (surprise, surprise): ਸਵੀਡਨ (Sweedan)
    In Arabic it is: السويد (As-suweed)
    In Korean: 스웨덴 (pronounced "Swaydenn")

    So no exceptions so far... BUT:

    In Chinese (pronunciations vary, but pinyin): 瑞典 (rui4 tian3)
    In Estonian - (a bit like Finnish): Rootsi
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Now I'm curious! Where does this Roo- root of Finno-Ugric languages (and Chinese?) come from?!

    :idea: P.S. Oh, wait! Is it the root Rus of Russia, Russian, perhaps?
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    :)
    Russia and the Russians were named after the Swedish Vikings, who were known in the Middle Ages as the Rus. In other words, Rus is an old word for "Swede".
     

    jester.

    Senior Member
    Germany -> German
    Outsider said:
    :)
    Russia and the Russians were named after the Swedish Vikings, who were known in the Middle Ages as the Rus. In other words, Rus is an old word for "Swede".
    Interesting. I had no idea about that. But it seems then that you are right. I presume that this is indeed the root used in languages in which Sweden begins with an R.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Outsider said:
    Now I'm curious! Where does this Roo- root of Finno-Ugric languages (and Chinese?) come from?!
    First off, here's a small summary of translations into some languages. Usually, the word begins with "s" (it is derived from "sue-"/"swe-", the origin ís not known). Then, there's the prefix "ru-"/"ro-" in Finnish, Estonian, and Chinese; these languages borrowed the prefix from "Rus:"

    Sverige (native name): derives from the phrase Svia Rike, meaning "the realm of the Swedes" (probably through Danish, even though a similar linguistic evolution happened within Swedish: mik->mig).
    Ruotsi (Finnish), Rootsi (Estonian), Rūotšmō (Livonian), Ruoŧŧa (Sami): probably from a Varangian people called the Rus', originating from Roslagen in Svealand. Scholars debate the meaning of rus, but it probably originates from the element roþs- ("relating to rowing") which has the same origin as row.
    Outsider said:
    :idea: P.S. Oh, wait! Is it the root Rus of Russia, Russian, perhaps?
    That's at least what the Wikipedia article says.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Is s --> r a common sound shift between Cantonese and Mandarin, or did each of them get the word for Sweden from a different source?
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    Outsider said:
    Is s --> r a common sound shift between Cantonese and Mandarin, or did each of them get the word for Sweden from a different source?
    Judging that the Mandarin and Cantonese versions are both written with the same characters, the word probably came into the Chinese languages through southern China, where the "s" sound is predominant. I doubt China had more contact with Finnish people than they did with the Brits/Russians/French/Germans who use the "s" sound.

    I am not a native speaker, but I don't think s --> r is a very common sound shift. The primary shift to r is from y: y --> r (e.g. Cantonese "yuk" = Mandarin "rou" (meat); Cantonese "yit" = Mandarin "re" (hot))
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    I would like to thank all of you for your posts!

    I knew from the start that the Finnish name for Sweden started with "R" (but I didn't dare to write it down, because I didn't want to offend anybody if I spelled it wrong :eek:). But from what I've heard, the "Ruo-" from Ruotsi means "Roslagen". The name actually meaning "the people from Roslagen" or "the land of the Roses".

    :) robbie
     

    MarX

    Banned
    Indonesian, Indonesia
    In Indonesian: Swèdia

    Notice that è is just a pronunciation help. It's normally written as Swedia.
     

    Christo Tamarin

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    ...the word begins with "s" (it is derived from "sue-"/"swe-", the origin ís not known).
    The etymology suggestions can be found here.

    For those speaking Russian, the country name in old Swedish "swerik" meant something like "свой рейх". Note that Slavic and Germanic were old proto-languages developed in neighbourhood.

    Perhaps, the name Swabia had the same root.
     
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