Swedish: för-, mellan- och efternamnas

Discussion in 'Nordic Languages' started by Vaskes, May 12, 2018.

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  1. Vaskes

    Vaskes Member

    Sofia
    Bulgarian - Bulgaria
    I'm not quite sure what this means in the following context:

    Visst. Visst. Barndomstrauma hit och barndomstrauma dit.
    Men man ritar ETT litet styckningsschema på kossan på omslaget till Brago Djurkexpaketet.
    Och helt plötsligt ska man för-, mellan- och efternamnas?
    Jag tycker att det är att ta i.


    What does giving his full name to somebody imply? That the social services would be interrogating the narrator, or what?
     
  2. MattiasNYC Senior Member

    New York
    Swedish
    I think more context is needed.

    Instinctively, my guess is that there's a complaint made by the author that childhood traumas are for lack of a better word "overrated". So it seems to me the author thinks that "anything" causes a trauma in children, even just putting a schematic of how to butcher a cow on a packet of biscuits. So to make sure that children aren't 'hurt' by that image the cows on the images are given names to lessen the impact. (in other words it's not the author that is giving his full name)

    The reason I think it needs more context though is because the above doesn't make much sense. Giving a name to an animal makes you care for it more, and so the idea that you would kill and butcher something with a name only makes it worse. And on top of that I really doubt there are actual images of how to butcher cows on those biscuit boxes. I can't find many, but they seem to be targeted to children. (www.goteborgskex.se/topplistan/brago/bragos-barnkex)

    So, I have to ask: Was this intended as a joke or something?
     
  3. raumar Senior Member

    Oslo, Norway
    Norwegian
    I agree that more context would be useful, but I suppose this is about a father and his little son, as in your other posts. The question is then who "man" refers to, and I suppose that "man" is the narrator himself, in both sentences.

    "för-, mellan- och efternamnas" can't mean "giving your full name to somebody". It is rather to be given a full name, as Mattias says, or - probably the case here - to be addressed by your full name.

    The way I read this story, it is the narrator (the father) who has drawn these lines on the cow on the biscuit packet, to show how this happy, innocent-looking cow can be butchered. The father thinks that this is funny, but somebody else (presumably the child's mother) disagrees, and thinks that this will give their son a childhood trauma. Because she is angry and wants to underline how serious this is, she addresses her husband with his full name - not just his first name.

    But this is just my interpretation - this is not entirely clear!
     
  4. MattiasNYC Senior Member

    New York
    Swedish
    Ah! Interesting. Makes sense.
     
  5. Vaskes

    Vaskes Member

    Sofia
    Bulgarian - Bulgaria
    Ah, thanks! I've misunderstood the meaning of "för-, mellan- och efternamnas".

    There's no more context, this is the whole "chapter". It's definitely intended to be funny. The way I took it, he drew the butchering lines and somebody overreacted. I just couldn't understand who and in what way. The more serious the overreaction, the funnier the joke, so I assumed the kindergarten staff or even the social services, but his wife being angry makes more sense.
     
  6. MattiasNYC Senior Member

    New York
    Swedish
    The rest of the book or whatever it is, the rest of the story, is the wider context.
     
  7. Vaskes

    Vaskes Member

    Sofia
    Bulgarian - Bulgaria
    Well, the whole book is mostly made up of very short anecdotal stories. Actually a lot of them were first written as blog entries and then put together in a book. It's not a novel or a continuous story. Many of the snippets are about the author's experience as a father, but otherwise they are not connected with each other.

    Some are similar in structure to this one and sometimes it's another kid's parents that don't get the author's humour, sometimes it's his wife. At the end of one particular story he jokes that "if someone from the social services comes knocking at the door, that's the reason" (hence my initial assumption).
     

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