Swedish: har haft 210 mg morgon men har fått utsatt 140

Gavril

Senior Member
English, USA
From a patient's comments/complaints about a medication:

Jag har haft 210 mg morgon men har fått utsatt 140 och det hänvisas till FASS.

"I have had 210 mg in the mornings but I was exposed to 140[???], and this was referred to FASS."

I don't think I'm grasping the intended meaning of this sentence.

Maybe part of the problem is that I'm not translating "utsätta" correctly?

I seem to recall that there's a relatively common meaning of "utsätta" that is missed by most Swedish-English dictionaries, but I can't remember what it is.

Thanks for any assistance.
 
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  • Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    A bit further down in the same letter, we have:

    Är det helt riskfritt att sätta ut 140mg [läkemedel 1] ihop med 10mg [läkemedel 2]?

    – where "sätta ut" may have the same meaning as "utsätta" in the previous sentence. (But I'm nowhere closer to resolving the intended meaning.)
     

    Swedish Anna

    Senior Member
    Swedish, Sweden
    Doctors use sätta in when they prescribe medicine to a patient.(Compare: Put someone on medication.)
    When it's time for the patient to stop taking the medicine it's called sätta ut.
    Here are three examples that I found when i googled:
    "Sätt ut läkemedel som inte ger avsedd effekt"
    "Långsam utsättning av läkemedel"
    "Utsättningsbesvär"

    In your examples however the patient seems to have misunderstood how utsätta/sätt ut is used.
    Could this be the patient's intended meaning?
    "I used to take 210 mg in the morning, but now I have been prescribed 140 mg. "
    "Is it totally safe to put someone on 140 mg X plus 10 mg Y?"
    Allt gott!
    A
     

    Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Based on the limited amount of information I have, it seems as though the patient has had 140 mg removed from his prescription, and it's now only 70 mg.

    Would that fit with how sätta ut is used in medical prescriptions?
     

    Swedish Anna

    Senior Member
    Swedish, Sweden
    Yes, "remove medicine" is the correct meaning of sätta ut. But sätta ut is used in a rather odd way here. Normally you would say how many mg you are actually taking now, or use minska - jag minskade dosen med 140 mg.
    Sätta ut is often used like this: Sätta ut x(=the medicine). Sätta ut x under ett halvår.
     

    Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Thanks for the responses!

    One other question for now:

    When you read the phrase "sätta ut 140mg [läkemedel 1] ihop med 10mg [läkemedel 2]", do you interpret this to mean

    1) going off both these medications (or at least the stated doses thereof)

    2) going off the first while keeping the second

    3) neither

    Regards,
    Gavril
     
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