Swedish: knäfyrfota

Gavril

Senior Member
English, USA
An excerpt from physical therapy instructions:

Axelträning:
- Knäfyrfota serratuspress – hitta neutralt läge rygg/skuldra, pressa upp o håll – Skjut sedan dig bakåt mot hälarna. Pressa med benen tillbaka o håll emot med armar.

"Serratus press" is apparently a kind of shoulder-muscle exercise. But I can't figure out what "knäfyrfota" is doing here.

Can someone give me a short, basic definition of what "knäfyrfota" is?

Is it a noun or an adjective? A static position of the body? A motion?

Your time is appreciated,
Gavril
 
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  • MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    Never heard "knäfyrfota" specifically, just either "knän" or "fyrfota". I'd intuitively think of it as an adjective meaning a knee-plank position where you use your knees for partial support. But like I said, first time I've heard of this.
     

    Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Hi Autumnowl,


    I appreciate your responding to this thread.

    The photo caption is helpful, but in my opinion, it's still a bit ambiguous: it doesn't say, "This is knäfyrfota", or equivalent, but rather it instructs the reader to "Stå knäfyrfota och jobba på skulderstabilitet och magstödet."

    In other words, that photo may contain a lot of information besides just "knäfyrfota", and I don't know how to properly sift through this information to get the answer I'm looking for.

    Maybe I'm being too exacting here, but what I'd like to see is a blunt, explicit statement saying "knäfyrfota means [X]" (or equivalent), rather than texts that assume the reader's prior knowledge of the term.

    Thanks again for your time,
    Gavril
     

    MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    The photo caption is helpful, but in my opinion, it's still a bit ambiguous: it doesn't say, "This is knäfyrfota", or equivalent, but rather it instructs the reader to "Stå knäfyrfota och jobba på skulderstabilitet och magstödet."

    In other words, that photo may contain a lot of information besides just "knäfyrfota", and I don't know how to properly sift through this information to get the answer I'm looking for.

    I disagree. I think it's pretty clear. "Fyrfota" is when you use four feet. Since humans don't have four feet what we mean by it when referring to humans is hands and feet. Since it then adds the word for knee it really says to stand on all four except using your knees instead of feet. There isn't really any other reasonable interpretation and I'm guessing that this construction is the result of there not being any other word for it that's easy to say (that I can think of at least). We could say "stå på knäna" but that doesn't include hands and could mean that hands are not touching the ground.

    Additionally I don't really think any other information in the picture or in the text below it would modify our understand of the term in any significant way.
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    Swedish, Finnish
    In yoga when doing the Cat/cow pose, the starting pose is called the table or tabletop pose, and it's the same as the Swedish 'knäfyrfota' .
    In the Downward dog pose you stand 'on all four', in Swedish 'på alla fyra'.
     
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    Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    OK, fair enough. :) I accept your explanation.

    I think there was some nuance of "fyrfota" (such as that explained by MattiasNYC) that I wasn't familiar with before, and kept me from being able to straightforwardly see the picture until now.
     
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