Swedish: slåtterkoja

  • MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    hmmm... I think "barn" implies a place in which you store things, like animals or what you harvest. "Koja" on the other hand to me seems more like a place in which people are, and it's also as you thought generally smaller. I'd also say it's more basic than a home of course.

    So in this case I'd say that this is a structure similar to a "cabin", basically equipped, and used during the time that people are engaging in "slåtter". "slåtter" is translated into "mowing", though I think it's a bit more specific and relates to traditional mowing when managing larger or specific areas especially in agriculture.

    I hope that's an accurate description and I think other Swedes can fill in the gaps or correct me. Anyway, if you search for the respective words separately you'll likely find descriptions of both. And actually, "slåtter" is perhaps best understood by looking at what you find on YouTube when searching on that term.
     

    Kajeetah

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Thanks a lot!
    I went for the French for "isolated cabin" as the important thing to undestand in my context is that it's in the middle of nowhere.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    hmmm... I think "barn" implies a place in which you store things, like animals or what you harvest. "Koja" on the other hand to me seems more like a place in which people are, and it's also as you thought generally smaller. I'd also say it's more basic than a home of course.

    So in this case I'd say that this is a structure similar to a "cabin", basically equipped, and used during the time that people are engaging in "slåtter". "slåtter" is translated into "mowing", though I think it's a bit more specific and relates to traditional mowing when managing larger or specific areas especially in agriculture.

    I hope that's an accurate description and I think other Swedes can fill in the gaps or correct me. Anyway, if you search for the respective words separately you'll likely find descriptions of both. And actually, "slåtter" is perhaps best understood by looking at what you find on YouTube when searching on that term.
    "slå" in this context means "mow with a scythe".
     

    MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    It sort of does yes, but it refers to the desired outcome or task and at some point of course the actual scythe was replaced by other tools.
     
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