Swedish: urnariggad

eeladvised

Member
Slovene - Slovenia
Hello all,

What does the word urnariggad mean in the following passage? I couldn't find anything like it in any dictionary.

Sedan däckades skutan med skinn, spändt som en trumma; en mast, som kunde tagas af, hade sin plats i klykor i fören och båten blef urnariggad. (Sven Hedin, Asien: tusen mil på okända vägar (Stockholm, 1903), vol. 1, p. 475)​

I checked a few translations but they are incomplete or inconsistent. The English translation says that the boat was "rigged with a fore and aft sail"; the German, by contrast, says that it "trug ein einziges Segel" (carried a single sail); the French says simply that it was "gréée" (rigged).
 
  • MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    I should add that it seems to me to be separate from the parts regarding the sail(s) and mast. Either it's a term for the process that was described earlier in the sentence or it's an additional step in the process.
     

    eeladvised

    Member
    Slovene - Slovenia
    I agree that it's three separate steps, and I don't think that the first part has anything to do with sails - the boat in question was a tiny canoe-like thing and the skins covered the hull of the boat:

    Then we covered her with skins stretched as taut as a drum. A mast, which could be put up and taken down at pleasure, was fixed in crutches in the fore part of the boat, and she was rigged with a fore and aft sail. (Central Asia and Tibet (London, 1903), vol. 1, p. 413.)​

    I got as far as "urna" and "rigga" as well, but how could urns have anything to do with rigging?

    Could it be a misprint for "utriggad"?
     

    MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    I didn't realize it was a boat without sail, but it doesn't really matter as far as the question goes I suppose.

    "Utriggad" seems like it fits fine and I could see how a misprint could have happened perhaps, or a misreading at some point.
     

    winenous

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I've been googling...

    In English dinghies can be "lug rigged", which is a type of "fore-and-aft" rigging. And there is a suggestion that the word "lug" is thought to be used because it is the slang English word for "ear". The dictionary entry above for "urna" refers to amphorae, and the word "amphora" is specifically a vessel with handles that look a bit like ears.

    Too far-fetched perhaps? But it is consistent with the English translation given by the OP.

    Edit: I must admit, the more I think about it, the more far-fetched it seems :)
     
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    eeladvised

    Member
    Slovene - Slovenia
    I think it's intriguing, but I can't find any examples of anyone else using that word, and I think it's unlikely that Hedin would have coined it just like that and expected people to know what he had in mind... At least I now know that a "fore and aft sail" doesn't mean that there were two sails, a fore one and an aft one, so in that sense the translations in the English and German editions aren't inconsistent with each other.
     

    eeladvised

    Member
    Slovene - Slovenia
    He is on the bank of the Tarim river in East Turkestan (present-day Xinjiang Province, China). On one map he gives the coordinates as 40°52'2'' N, 86°50'45'' E. But he doesn't seem to have used this canoe for anything more than a short test voyage on the Tarim: Central Asia and Tibet. Towards the holy city of Lassa : Hedin, Sven Anders, 1865-1952 : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive
    None of the illustrations in the book seem to be showing this particular canoe, unless I overlooked something.
     

    Abbe

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    Do you have a digital version of the Swedish text? I found one on archive.org but the relevant chapter is missing
     

    eeladvised

    Member
    Slovene - Slovenia
    Yes, it's messed up, it has pages from volume 2 instead... both volumes are on hathitrust, but the scan of vol. 1 is the same as on archive.org and has the same problem. I uploaded the missing pages here now: imgur gallery
     
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    eeladvised

    Member
    Slovene - Slovenia
    Thanks for the suggestion! I asked in that forum, and it turns out that it's probably a misprint of "unariggad". The SAOB doesn't have a separate entry for it, but in the entry for kattrigg it indicates "unarigg" as a synonym. Both terms actually come from English, "cat-rigged" and "una-rigged"; it means there's one mast and one sail (which is of the fore-and-aft type).

    Turns out there's an interesting story behind the name: link.
     
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