sweep through

Jignesh77

Senior Member
India- hindi
What’s the analog of this equation in angular terms? That’s easy; you just substitute angle theta for the distance, so the angular velocity is theta/t. That means that angular velocity is the angle (in radians) that an object sweeps through per second. The symbol for angular velocity is omega, so you can write the equation for angular velocity this way:
Angular Velocity - dummies
what does "sweep through" mean?
is it a phrasal verb? I couldn't find this particular meaning. Why do we need "through" here?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    angular velocity is the angle (in radians) that an object sweeps through per second.
    =
    angular velocity is the angle (in radians) through which an object sweeps per second.

    Yes, you need through, or some other preposition.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Which meaning or sense of through is used here?
    SWEEP (verb) definition and synonyms | Macmillan Dictionary
    I can't decide which meaning of "sweep" fits the context perfectly?
    The verb "to sweep" has many meanings. You need a more complete dictionary. For example, the WRF dictionary you can reach through the box at the top of this page has the definition "to move, pass, or extend in a continuous course, esp. a wide curve or circuit," with the example "His glance swept around the room."
     

    Jignesh77

    Senior Member
    India- hindi
    Which meaning or sense of through is used here?
    I know the preposition shows relationship between an object of the preposition and the other parts of the sentence. What kind of relationship does it show? direction? what does through mean here?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    From the definition of through
    • across the extent of:traveled through Europe.

    angle (anggəl), n., v., n. Mathematics[Geom.]
    the space within two lines or three or more planes diverging from a common point, or within two planes diverging from a common line.
     

    Jignesh77

    Senior Member
    India- hindi
    I am so sorry I still don't understand the use of the preposition "through" here?
    Can we replace "through" with "across" after "sweep" in the original? What would the sentence mean with the preposition across?
    Thank you!
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It represents distance traveled, essentially, but is slightly more complicated because this is about rotation and area.

    Imagine going through a tunnel. You are passing from one end to the other.

    But it can be used for unenclosed spaces. You can pass through the countryside.

    That's one dimensional travel along a line. You go over the ground following a thin line.

    Now imagine a whole line traveling perpendicular to the direction of movement. Say you are driving a harvester through a field of wheat. It sweeps through an area as it moves. It covers an area, not just a line.

    tseries-combine-r2C001197-1024x576.jpg


    Now if that harvesters starts turning, then the area it sweeps through will be in the form of a circle. The total angle the harvester turns can be measured.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I am so sorry I still don't understand the use of the preposition "through" here?
    Can we replace "through" with "across" after "sweep" in the original? What would the sentence mean with the preposition across?
    Thank you!
    The definition is not just "across". Using the dictionary definition you can change "through" to "across the extent of the angle".
     

    Jignesh77

    Senior Member
    India- hindi
    angular velocity is the angle (in radians) that an object sweeps through per second
    Is the prepositional phrase "per second" an adverb?
    Adverbs generally answer the question when,how, why, where or how often something happens. I can't decide as an adverb, which adverb question does it answer?
    Thank you!
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    You understand vehicle speed in terms of "miles per hour", right? (How many miles in one hour of travel time)
    "Degrees per second" is the same structure for how quickly something sweeps through an angle. A second hand on a clock sweeps through 360° per minute (if the clock is accurate:))

    Or are you asking what grammarians might call it in terms of their nomenclature system? (If so, I'll stand back and watch the discussion - there is more than one system for that)
     

    Jignesh77

    Senior Member
    India- hindi
    Thank you! Yes, I am asking whether the prepositional phrase "through per second" is an adverb or an adjective? And if it is an adverb, which adverb question does it answer?
     

    Jignesh77

    Senior Member
    India- hindi
    Thank you!
    I got confused because I couldn't decide whether "through" is an adverb or a preposition here? Just to clear my doubt, how do we confirm that?
    Isn't a preposition always followed by a noun or a noun phrase?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Isn't a preposition always followed by a noun or a noun phrase?
    No. It can be moved elsewhere in the sentence if the structure requires that.

    He walked in to a room.
    Which room did he walk into?
    That is the room into which he walked -> That is the room he walked into. Into is a still preposition.

    The second hand sweeps through 360°. An object sweeps through an angle at a rate that is defined by its angular velocity in radians per second. That's not idiomatic but just shows the relationship of the preposition to its object.
     
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