sweet dumplings is named yuanxiao in pinyin

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Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wondering whether the underlined part is idiomatic:

"Sweet dumplings is named yuanxiao in pinyin."

Thoughts and context: I was explaining what we pronounce sweet dumpling in Chinese.
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, pinyin is just a way of rendering Mandarin Chinese in the Latin alphabet. I think talking about pinyin is distracting in your sentence.

    Sweet dumplings are called yuanxiao in (Mandarin) Chinese.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Yes, pinyin is just a way of rendering Mandarin Chinese in the Latin alphabet. I think talking about pinyin is distracting in your sentence.

    Sweet dumplings are called yuanxiao in (Mandarin) Chinese.
    But yuanxiao is actually pinyin written in letters.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Yes, but this is a different case.
    They are similar in that the problem is confusion of the difference between words (Mandarin Chinese) and the way words are written (pinyin).
    The difference between Mandarin and pinyin has been explained twice now.
    He is named Tom (in English, in Mandarin).
    His name is spelled t, o, m. (in English spelling, in pinyin)
    You cannot be named/called anything in letters/pinyin.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    I agree with Myridon and the others; it is similar to saying "His name is Tom in the Roman alphabet." It's just not right.

    I would say something like "The Mandarin for 'sweet dumplings' is 'yuanxiao'."
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    They are similar in that the problem is confusion of the difference between words (Mandarin Chinese) and the way words are written (pinyin).
    The difference between Mandarin and pinyin has been explained twice now.
    He is named Tom (in English, in Mandarin).
    His name is spelled t, o, m. (in English spelling, in pinyin)
    You cannot be named/called anything in letters/pinyin.
    Got it. I feel it just sounds odd for me because it supposed to be "It is 元宵 in Mandarin" rather than "it is yuanxiao in mandarin" for me.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I agree with Myridon and the others; it is similar to saying "His name is Tom in the Roman alphabet." It's just not right.

    I would say something like "The Mandarin for 'sweet dumplings' is 'yuanxiao'."
    Got it. Thank you very much.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Got it. I feel it just sounds odd for me because it supposed to be "It is 元宵 in Mandarin" rather than "it is yuanxiao in mandarin" for me.
    Two points.

    (1) If you say out the sentence, the way the Mandarin word is represented in writing is not relevant.
    (2) If you write out the sentence, it will be obvious that you are using the Latin alphabet and writing romanised Mandarin Chinese (pinyin).
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Two points.

    (1) If you say out the sentence, the way the Mandarin word is represented in writing is not relevant.
    (2) If you write out the sentence, it will be obvious that you are using the Latin alphabet and writing romanised Mandarin Chinese (pinyin).
    Got it. Thank you very much.
     
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