Sweet Jesus/ Sweet God

Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Good morning ladies & gentlemen, there is the exclamation Sweet Jesus! in English and Édes Istenem! (lit.: my sweet God) in Hungarian. Do you know other languages using the exclamation made up of sweet + Jesus, God, Mary etc. Thank you for your help & have a productive day. Enco form Prague, Czechia.
 
  • We don't use it in Greek, we say «Θεέ μου!» [θeˈe mu] --> my God! (Θεέ is the vocative of Θεός = God), «Χριστέ μου!» [xriˈste mu] --> my Christ! (Χριστέ is the vocative of Χριστός = Christ); the closest one Ι can think of is the use of diminutives for both names which shows intimacy: «Θεούλη μου!» [θeˈu.li nu] --> my little God! (my dear God, my sweet God), or «Χριστούλη μου!» [xriˈstu.li mu] --> my little Christ! (my dear Christ, my sweet Christ)
     
    Last edited:

    alfaalfa

    Senior Member
    italiano
    Ciao,
    you Greek use diminutives
    we Italian use diminutive too, talking about Mother Mary:
    Oh Madonnina mia (My little Madonna!)
    We don't have any "sweetie" in exclamations with Jesus, God or Christ.
    As in Greek we have:
    Mio Dio/ Gesù mio/Cristo mio (less common).
    All of above are neutral but most of (any other) exclamation involving Jesus, God, Mary or all the Saints tend to the blasphemy.

    PS There's a short prayer:
    Dolce Cuor del mio Gesù, fa ch’io t’ami sempre più (my Jesus' sweet heart, let me love you <Jesus> more and more).
    Finally I found something sweet :)
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    In Catalan, not with sweet. If anything, with bon ('good').

    But Jesús in exclamation here is rather a sign of surprise or said to someone who just sneezed.

    The ones used much more in combination in Catalan are Déu ('God') or Senyor ('Lord') and his Mother Mare de Déu (='Virgin (Mary)').
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    In Spanish, it's not used as an exclamation but it's used as part of a prayer. The same it's true for my loved Jesus.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Cymraeg/Welsh

    Sweet Jesus = Iesu annwyl/tirion/cu

    'annwyl'
    = dear
    'tirion' = gentle, mild, tender
    'cu' = dear, beloved

    Usually, the expressions will be used as 'ordinary' adjectives - not as exclamations or expletives. Traditionally, the Welsh have been a very religious (Protestant Non-comformist) people, so any oaths/swear words have usually invoked the Deity (or his Son). These would be considered very strong/offensive as the God figure played such a large part of peoples' lives. (Sexual swear words would often derive from more 'Anglo Saxon' terms.)
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    I must have read "zoete Jezus" in older texts, I thought, but it might have been "the sweet name of Jesus", Jesus' nameday, to be celebrated on January 3, often celebrated by Jesuits, so it seems... But as far as I can see it seems uncommon in Dutch. We do refer to Onze Lieve Heer, our beloved [+:- sweet] Lord, literally, but that has again become outdated, I am afraid...
     
    Last edited:

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    (then, we also have "mon Dieu" ("my God"), and "Jésus, Marie, Joseph", but that's a bit off topic)

    That last one made me recall my grandmother, as she would always use it when something shocked her: Jesús Maria Josep!! [Central Catalan: /ʒəzuzməɾiəʒu'zεp/], often in a very fast way, as if it was just one word.

    Funnily, I don't know if it's used rurally in (northern) Spanish too, but I've heard it used by some ceceo-using Andalusians in spoken southern Spanish, transforming Jesús in /o'θu/: ¡Ozú María Jozé!
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Well, it is off-topic, of course, but interesting comments, indeed. In Hungarian we say: Jérus, Mária, Szent József! (lit.: Jesus, Mary, Saint Joseph)
     
    ^^No Joseph in Greek, we say «Χριστός και Παναγιά!» [xriˈstɔs ce pa.naˈʝa] --> Christ and All-holy!; «Παναγία» [pa.naˈʝi.a] (fem.), and «Παναγιά» [pa.naˈʝa] (fem.) with synizesis, is the most common epithet for Mary = All-holy one.
    Or, «Χριστός κι η μάννα Tου!» [xriˈstɔs ci ˈma.na tu] --> Christ and His mum!
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Good morning ladies & gentlemen, there is the exclamation Sweet Jesus! in English and Édes Istenem! (lit.: my sweet God) in Hungarian. Do you know other languages using the exclamation made up of sweet + Jesus, God, Mary etc. Thank you for your help & have a productive day. Enco form Prague, Czechia.
    There is an expression "Иисусе сладчайший!" (~oh Jesus the sweetest!), but basically you have a chance to hear it only from educated clerics; an average Russian will rather give you a strange look if he hears that from you.
    It should be noted that Russian "сладкий" (sládkiy, "sweet", of Church Slavonic origin itself) has a more narrow usage than English "sweet".
     

    Le Gallois bilingue

    Senior Member
    English (U.K.)
    I am not persuaded “sweet Jesus” is particularly current in British English. However, it is a term that is heard over the sea in Roman Catholic Ireland in Irish English.
    As my fellow countryman Welsh Sion says, above, in Wales and I believe Scotland too where the traditions are much more Protestant/Presbyterian the use of such language would have been and still is deemed offensive and is avoided.
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    There is an expression "Иисусе сладчайший!" (~oh Jesus the sweetest!), but basically you have a chance to hear it only from educated clerics; an average Russian will rather give you a strange look if he hears that from you.
    It should be noted that Russian "сладкий" (sládkiy, "sweet", of Church Slavonic origin itself) has a more narrow usage than English "sweet".

    In Macedonian there are expressions with adjectives derived from both слад* (slad*) and благ* (blag*), but like you said, those expressions are rarely used in everyday speech among the common people.

    Examples:
    Исусе слатки... (ĺsuse slátki...)​
    Господе слатки... (Góspode slátki...)​
    Боже слатки... (Bóže slátki...)​
    Исусе благи... (ĺsuse blági...)​
    Господе благи... (Góspode blági...)​
    Боже благи... (Bóže blági...)​
    Блажен Исусе... (Blážen ĺsuse...)​
    Блажен господи... (Blážen Góspodi...)​


    • Исус (Isus) = "Jesus"; Исусе (Isuse) vocative
    • Господ (Gospod) = "Lord"; Господе (Gospode), Господи (Gospodi) vocative
    • Бог (Bog) = "God"; Боже (Bože) vocative
    • сладок (sladok) adj.m. = "sweet", "pleasant", "tasty", "happy", "cute"...
    • благ (blag) adj.m. = "sweet", "mellow", "mild"...
    • блажен (blažen) adj.m. = "blissful"
     
    Last edited:

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    I must have read "zoete Jezus" in older texts, I thought, but it might have been "the sweet name of Jesus", Jesus' nameday, to be celebrated on January 3, often celebrated by Jesuits, so it seems... But as far as I can see it seems uncommon in Dutch. We do refer to Onze Lieve Heer, our beloved [+:- sweet] Lord, literally, but that has again become outdated, I am afraid...
    We do have:

    O mijn God! (Oh my God!)
    Jeeeeeeezus! (Jesus!)
    Goeie God! (Good God!)
    Mijn hemel! (My heaven!)
    Hemeltje lief! (Little heaven beloved/sweet!)
     
    Top