Sweetie!

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Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hello, I realized both Hungarian & English use the word "sweet" also as term of endearment, while Czech does not. How about other languages? Can the adjective sweet in language you know used in endearments? Thanks.

Hungarian: Édesem! (both male and female, édes - sweet; édesem - my sweet)
 
  • In Greek too there's a similar term of endearment:
    «Γλυκέ μου!» [ɣliˈce mu] --> my sweet one (masc. vocative sing. addressed to males), «γλυκιά μου!» [ɣliˈca mu] --> my sweet one (fem. vocative sing. addressed to females), «γλυκό μου!» [ɣliˈkɔ mu] --> my sweet one (neut. vocative sing. usually addressed to children).

    -MoGr adj. «γλυκός, -ιά, -κό» [ɣliˈkɔs] (masc.), [ɣliˈca] (fem.), [ɣliˈkɔ] (neut.) --> sweet, delightful < Classical adj. «γλυκύς, -εῖα, -ύ» glŭkús (masc.), glŭkeî̯a (fem.), glŭkú (neut.) --> pleasant, delightful, sweet (PIE *dḷku- sweet cf Lat. dulcis).
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    No, you can't in Spanish. The most usual way to say "sweetie" is cariño (often shortened to cari), which can also mean "affection", "fondness"... There are many other alternatives of course, but none of them include any reference to sweetness to my knowledge.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Interesting, it exists in Greek. I am afraid it does not exist in Slavic, Germanic and Romance languages, so let's read about less common languages.
     

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    "Dolcezza" (sweetness) is used as a term of endearment in Italian sometimes, but perhaps nowadays it feels too old-fashioned...
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    I am afraid it does not exist in Slavic, Germanic and Romance languages...
    I actually think it does exist in Serbian / Croatian languages in some way:

    Слаткиш мој! / Slatkiš moj! lit. "Sweet my!"

    слаткиш / slatkiš noun = sweet, dessert
     

    FyeFlowrith

    New Member
    Español
    In Spanish
    No, you can't in Spanish. The most usual way to say "sweetie" is cariño (often shortened to cari), which can also mean "affection", "fondness"... There are many other alternatives of course, but none of them include any reference to sweetness to my knowledge.

    Well, actualy I think in spanish we can say "oh, she/he is so sweet" "Ella/Él es muy dulce" so I think we can use it in that way. We might not say it to the other person directly like "Hey, sweetie" but we can use it to describe someone.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Hello, I realized both Hungarian & English use the word "sweet" also as term of endearment, while Czech does not. How about other languages? Can the adjective sweet in language you know used in endearments? Thanks.

    Hungarian: Édesem! (both male and female, édes - sweet; édesem - my sweet)
    Another very "sweet" way to refer to someone in English which may be even more common than sweetie or sweetheart is honey.. I'd say it's almost even routine with couples. Honey, my honey
    People even feel free to make up their own sweet terms of endearment: sweetie pie, sugar pie, cutie pie, cherry pie, sweet potato pie, pumpkin pie with whipped cream on it.

    In French you can call people chou which is literally a very sweet little cream puff. Mon chou, mon petit chou, tu es très chou. The terms choupinet / choupinette are diminutives of it and used as adjectives.
     
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    In-Su

    Banned
    Fr. French
    In French there is Ma douce ("my sweet one") which can be used for addressing one's female lover. I wouldn't recommend it, though, as it sounds rather posh and dated.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In French there is Ma douce ("my sweet one") which can be used for addressing one's female lover. I wouldn't recommend it, though, as it sounds rather posh and dated.
    Mostly same in Russian (m. "мой сладкий"/ f. "моя сладкая"). I wonder if it's a calque from some European language.
     

    Zareza

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    In Romanian

    dulceață (<Lat. dulcis) = sweetness (NOT dulceață = jam)
    bombonică (< Fr. bonbon ) = petit bonbon = candy - (only for girls)
    pișcoțel (< Hung. piskóta) = little sponge finger ; little ladyfinger

    There is also bombonel (<bombonică+ el) (only for boys), but it is ironically / pejoratively used - for a man (good and a little naive)
     
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    Zareza

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    сладкий. I wonder if it's a calque from some European language.
    сладкий - borrowed from Old Church Slavonic сладъкъ (sladŭkŭ), from Proto-Slavic *soldъkъ.

    Why do you wonder it is a calque ? Is it used by old people?
     
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    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The usage of the word as a term of endearment might have been calqued. Or maybe not. While "~my sweet" sounds pretty strange, uncommon, possibly heightened and/or dated, it is largely about the syntax; in the expressive construction "~sweet you my" it sounds natural and usual enough indeed.
     
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