swimming pool with 3 pools?

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takiakos76

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hi!

Does a "swimming pool" refer to both the actual pool that the water is in and the building that accommodates it?
More specifically, can I say
"This is a swimming pool with 3 pools"?
(Or only "this is a swimming pool complex", since there are more than one pools in it, like e.g. a 33-meter one, a 50-meter one and say a Jacuzzi for sitting around?)

Thanks!
 
  • George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    "Swimming pool complexes" often have more than one pool.

    GF..

    Nevertheless, "There are 3 pools (here)." would be more than sufficient..

    Mind you, a Jacuzzi is not a swimming pool. There are only 2 pools and a Jacuzzi.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hullo Taki. British (and I'm sure American too) establishments might avoid the clumsy repetition by calling themselves a Leisure Complex/Facility/Centre with Three Pools and the like.
     

    takiakos76

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Thank you for the explanations!

    One question still: can you call the facility itself simply a swimming pool, even if there's more than one pool inside the building? Or can you only call it a swimming pool complex / leisure complex etc. in that case?
    I.e., "Today I'm going to the swimming pool" (where there are several pools inside, but you don't say that, so there's no "clumsy repetition") - is that OK?

    Thanks!
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    One question still: can you call the facility itself simply a swimming pool, even if there's more than one pool inside the building? Or can you only call it a swimming pool complex / leisure complex etc. in that case?
    Thanks!
    A facility with several swimming pools and a jacuzzi is sometimes called an "aquatic center."
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ... "Today I'm going to the swimming pool" ... is that OK? ...
    Informally, that's OK. A listener who is familiar with the complex will assume that you plan to swim in one of its three (or two) pools, and that you know which one. Perhaps only one of them is used for the type of swimming you plan to do.

    However, like the others who have posted, I wouldn't use "swimming pool" to refer to the building as a whole.
     

    dharasty

    Senior Member
    American English
    In our area (northeastern U.S.), a place with one or more pools -- and possibly other outdoor activities such as a playground, shuffleboard, or tennis courts -- would most often be called a "swim club", since the ability to go there is limited to "members" who joined the "club".

    That said, it is VERY common in casual speech to refer to the whole facility as "the swimming pool".

    Example:

    "I'll be taking the kids to the pool this afternoon." (even if they will only play on the playground)

    In this context, I'd say "I'm at the pool". If I was actually in the water, I'd say "I'm in the pool."

    So: in formal writing, "swim club" (or the other suggestion from above) would be best. But if you are trying to write how people talk (e.g. you are writing dialog), then referring to the place as "the pool" or "the swimming pool" is definitely in the vernacular.

    In this vein "our pool has three pools" would be easily understood... at least in our region.
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    In our area (northeastern U.S.), a place with one or more pools -- and possibly other outdoor activities such as a playground, shuffleboard, or tennis courts -- would most often be called a "swim club", since the ability to go there is limited to "members" who joined the "club".
    There are "swim clubs" in Southern California that don't have any swimming pools at all. :eek:
    Members of these clubs meet at local beaches for social or competitive swims in the Pacific Ocean.

    However, there are numerous "swim and tennis clubs" in Southern California that have one or more swimming pools along with tennis courts "and possibly other outdoor activities..."
     
    Last edited:

    KennyHun

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Reviving this - not so old - thread to ask a related question. Most cities here have a public pool facility which usually means a building with a larger indoor pool, possibly two, a locker room etc., all indoors.

    Let's say you're standing outside the building and someone asks you where your friend is and you tell them they went back inside or are still inside, but want to emphasize that you're talking about the pool building. (Because there may be another building or for any number of other reasons.) How would you refer to the actual building? The pool building? "He went back inside the pool building?"
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Reviving this - not so old - thread to ask a related question. Most cities here have a public pool facility which usually means a building with a larger indoor pool, possibly two, a locker room etc., all indoors.

    Let's say you're standing outside the building and someone asks you where your friend is and you tell them they went back inside or are still inside, but want to emphasize that you're talking about the pool building. (Because there may be another building or for any number of other reasons.) How would you refer to the actual building? The pool building? "He went back inside the pool building?"
    I believe that works in the context you provide. :thumbsup:
     
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