swimming styles

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by jackie22, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. jackie22

    jackie22 Member

    Cambridge, UK
    UK, English
    breast-stroke = rana
    butterfly = farfalla?
    backstroke?
    front crawl?
    treading water? (staying in the same place, in deep water)

    thanks!
     
  2. primo_cerchio Senior Member

    Ivrea
    Italian Italy
    butterfly = farfalla
    backstroke=dorso
    front crawl=stile libero
     
  3. EvaKant

    EvaKant Member

    Northern Italy
    Italian, Italy
    Butterfly is "delfino" (dolphin), "farfalla" is not the swimming style you can see during Olympic Games or World Championship. :)
     
  4. Poianone

    Poianone Senior Member

    Udine, Italy
    Italian, Italy
    hello to everyone! I'd like to add that "treading water" has not a proper translation. You can simply say "stare a galla". By the way, if you want to be very accurate, or you refer to water polo players, you could say "fare la bicicletta sommersa"
     
  5. jackie22

    jackie22 Member

    Cambridge, UK
    UK, English
    Non ho capito la differenza fra farfalla e delfino, ma non è importante, perché non posso fare o l'uno o l'altro!
    grazie a tutti.
     
  6. kap

    kap Senior Member

    english/italiano (bilingual)
    Hi!

    May I butt in and ask what side-stroke is in Italian?

    And what about doggy-paddle?

    Is there a previous thread about this?

    kap
     
  7. Poianone

    Poianone Senior Member

    Udine, Italy
    Italian, Italy
    Well: butterfly is the same of dolphin style for what regards arms movements; instead, you move the legs as like you are swimming breast-stroke
     
  8. kap

    kap Senior Member

    english/italiano (bilingual)
    Sorry, but I don't agree. Butterfly is a combination of simultaneous crawl arm-strokes and simultaneous beating of the legs (which is NOT what you do in breast-stroke).

    At least this is how I learned in England.

    kap
     
  9. Poianone

    Poianone Senior Member

    Udine, Italy
    Italian, Italy
    Hi Kap! I found this http://www.vivereilmare.it/argomenti/glossario/n003.html that explains the differences between the aforementioned styles. Let me know what do you think about it. For what regard the other issues:
    Side-stroke=nuotare su un fianco (I don't think there is a proper translation)
    Doggy-paddle=nuotare come un cagnolino (idem)
     
  10. kap

    kap Senior Member

    english/italiano (bilingual)
    I like the page you found, but in English I maintain what I said. That is to say Butterfly to me is Delfino. I have no idea what Farfalla is in English. Maybe a mother-tongue can help.

    kap
     
  11. primo_cerchio Senior Member

    Ivrea
    Italian Italy
    Side stroke è nuoto alla marinara
    Doggy paddle è "a cagnolino"

    Delfino and farfalla are different but I dont know if a similar difference exist in Englsh between butterfly and dolphin
     
  12. Poianone

    Poianone Senior Member

    Udine, Italy
    Italian, Italy
    Very curious... It seems that in italian the style ufficially recognized as "butterfly" should be translated as delfino, which is in substance a modification of the farfalla style; it changes that in the latter the legs are moved as the breast-stroke style... Instead, in English "dolphin" identifies another style, with arms moved as in butterfly style and legs crawling!:eek:
     
  13. primo_cerchio Senior Member

    Ivrea
    Italian Italy
    I think that butterfly means farfalla and delfino dolphin also in Italian.
     
  14. kap

    kap Senior Member

    english/italiano (bilingual)
    I must repeat that I have not come across the term DOLPHIN in English. I only know Butterfly as a stroke and this seems to correspond to what you call Delfino in Italian.

    Try this link for more details.

    kap
     
  15. primo_cerchio Senior Member

    Ivrea
    Italian Italy
    Is in Italian the modern butterfly style called delfino but there still is a farfalla style?
    Does in English exist a dolphin style?

    I went googling in several Italian swimming competitions and I saw listed "farfalla" as the race.

    Now I doubt that the official name of the style can be delfino.

    http://www.finveneto.org/nuoto.php
     
  16. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    Hi everybody. I'll try to explain it in English.
    When I was young I swam in national team and I can assure you that in formal terminology there was no difference between delfino and farfalla (although delfino it was more used, at least in my day), but sometimes it happened that we athletes said that we swam the farfalla when we moved legs as in breaststroke style, instead with two stroke (of legs) for every stroke of arms. :)
    Actually, if you think of movements, the legs moved in breaststroke remind more the butterfly's flight than the dolphin's swim.
    As far as I know, stile libero is just crawl.
     
  17. Tatzingo

    Tatzingo Senior Member

    Where on Earth??
    English, UK
    Hi,

    Isn't stile libero "free style"?
    It is true that in most free style competitions, most choose to swim front crawl as it is the fastest stroke, but some also choose the butterfly. Is there not another word for "front crawl"? ... or maybe I'm completely wrong. Anyway, I'm sure swimming enthusiasts will correct me!!

    Tatz.
     
  18. primo_cerchio Senior Member

    Ivrea
    Italian Italy
    Sometimes in Italian front crawl is said as "crawl" using the Englisg world.
    Nuotare " a crawl"
     
  19. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    Hi, Tatz. No, when here in Italy we want use the English term for stile libero, we say crawl. But it doesn't mean that this is the correct word in English. :) Anyway, it is freestyle, it isn't a free style that you can choose. You can see it here.

    In the same site I've found an explanation for delfino/farfalla: at first it was called farfalla and the legs was moved as in breaststroke, then (1952) it changed and it became delfino, with the strokes of legs. Now two terms are the same.
     
  20. DAH

    DAH Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    USA/California--English
    In English, the stroke is called the Butterfly and it uses a dolfin kick. Both legs in unison undulate in a whipping kick. Parallel to the surface of the water, the kick starts at the hips and passes through the legs ending with the toes breaking the water line at then end of the kick.

    The breast stroke kick was used at a time "long ago and far away" and it was discontinued after the dolfin kick was perfected in the stroke sequence.

    [I have swum the stroke as well as the individual medley (IM, four stroke event.]
     
  21. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    Ahhh, thanks, DAH! I didn't know how to say in English "colpo di gambe"!
    Yes, that's exactly the reason why the style it's changed.
     
  22. kap

    kap Senior Member

    english/italiano (bilingual)
    Can we summarise as follows?

    Butterfly is the official stroke (overarm simultaneous combined with a dolphin kick). This is referred to as Delfino in Italian.

    Butterfly used to incorporate a breast-stroke leg movement previously. At that time it was called Farfalla in Italian.

    Butterfly has evolved. In English, the term has remained, whereas in Italian it has evolved from Farfalla to Delfino. The term Dolphin does not exist in English in this context.

    kap
     
  23. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    Why not? It seems all correct to me.
     
  24. mariaeulalia Senior Member

    Queretaro, Mexico
    Mexico-Spanish
    Hola,

    E corretto de dire:
    il crawl, il dorso, il petto e la farfalla cuando parlamo di stili di nuotare?

    Grazie.....
     
  25. TimLA

    TimLA Member Emeritus

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    QUI c'è un buon Wiki, che ti aiutarà.
     
  26. Parergon Senior Member

    Switzerland
    Italiano, Italia
    I would say stili di nuoto.
     
  27. Parergon Senior Member

    Switzerland
    Italiano, Italia
    :)
     
  28. mariaeulalia Senior Member

    Queretaro, Mexico
    Mexico-Spanish
    Grazie a tutti!!!
     

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