swing by

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piggy94

Banned
Korean&English
Is the following expression correct?

I will swing by a shopping center on my way home. I need to buy a jaket.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If I were ninety years younger I might consider using it. I've not swung much since the sixties. No, Piggy, I wouldn't use it if I were you, but there may be very young people who do.
     

    MonikaUSA

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Hello, piggy94:

    This is an expression that is used quite frequently here -- especially among those who are middle-aged+!

    I will swing by the shopping center on my way home. I need to buy a jacket. OR I am going to drop by the shopping center on my way home ...

    Happy Holidays! Shop 'til you drop!
     

    Waylink

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    [ swing by ] is an American English expression sometimes heard/used (and usually understood!) in the UK especially among people susceptible to AE influences.

    I would say it is neither "correct" nor "incorrect"; it all depends on where, with whom and how it is used.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Swing by" is not uncommon in the U.S. meaning "a small diversion." Your submission is not correct, however, because of the misspelling of "jacket."

    There is nothing grammatically wrong with "a shopping center" if you do not wish to be specific.
     

    brighthope

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I have both Longman American English Dictionary and Macmillan American English Dictionary at hand and both have the entry for "swing by" under "swing". Both say the same meaning which is "to visit a place or person for a short time, usually for a particular purpose"
    (Personally I don't hear the expression often here in Toronto, Canada- I'm usually with people who are between 20-40 years old.)
     
    Last edited:

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    I use swing by pretty often, but usually in the context of picking someone/something up OR dropping someone/something off:

    I'll swing by (your house) around 10 PM (to pick you up).
    I swung by (your house) earlier, but you weren't home.
    When can you swing by (to pick up/drop off XYZ)?


    Thus, if you say that you're going to swing by a shopping center to buy a jacket, I immediately get the sense that you're really "picking up" a jacket, in the sense that you already know exactly what you want, or you don't care what you buy (you'll take the first jacket you see), so that you're in and out really fast.

    A synonym of swing by is stop by.
     

    guilaK

    Member
    Persian
    Hi.THOMAS.THANKS for your greeting.
    I,m trying to learn AE,And it isn't unusual in American English but I'm not sure about BE.I will be glad if you let me know.

    with the best wishes
    guilak
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi Guilak,

    I don't think it's common in BE. I suspect that Waylink, who, like me, speaks BE, sums it up very well.

    If you are learning AE, then take the advice of the AE members, who seem happy with it. You'd find BE speakers thought the expression a little odd, but they'd understand it without difficulty.

    Happy Christmas!
     

    guilaK

    Member
    Persian
    Hi Guilak,

    I don't think it's common in BE. I suspect that Waylink, who, like me, speaks BE, sums it up very well.

    If you are learning AE, then take the advice of the AE members, who seem happy with it. You'd find BE speakers thought the expression a little odd, but they'd understand it without difficulty.

    Happy Christmas!
    Hi thomas.
    Thanks a million for your answers and suggestions.
    I learned more than I expected.
    merry christmas.
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    I have both Longman American English Dictionary and Macmillan American English Dictionary at hand and both have the entry for "swing by" under "swing". Both say the same meaning which is "to visit a place or person for a short time, usually for a particular purpose"
    (Personally I don't hear the expression often here in Toronto, Canada- I'm usually with people who are between 20-40 years old.)
    Really? Are you suggesting it has a generation gap for usage? In the USA it is a well used expression. But then, I never hang with anyone under twenty unless they are my grandchildren.:):)
     

    brighthope

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Really? Are you suggesting it has a generation gap for usage? In the USA it is a well used expression. But then, I never hang with anyone under twenty unless they are my grandchildren.:):)
    Hi,
    I'm not really suggesting a generation gap pops91719! I just happen to be around the AE native speakers of this generation most of the time.So I can only talk about my experience with them. I just wanted to say my experience is limited more than anything.:) I added it because MonikaUSA wrote it was used "especially among those who are middle-aged+!"...
     

    brighthope

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I found something interesting. It was actually discussed here. Here, the question was both about "swing away" and "swing by" and they didn't discuss "swing by" a lot, but the member "Dorian" wrote something interesting.
    "Swing by" is one of those phrases that you don't hear very often -- at least, I don't. The only person I know who uses it a lot is my father-in-law. To me it means that somebody will be going somewhere else (usually by car) and will be happy to make a little detour to visit, and it will be no problem.
    "I'll swing by on Saturday and drop off the parcel."

    I guess some synonyms would be
    drop by
    drop over
    come by
    come around
    pay a quick visit



    He is from Vancouver Canada, and a native Canadian English speaker.
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Notice that that example has drop off the parcel, just like I explained in post #9:

    brian said:
    I use swing by pretty often, but usually in the context of picking someone/something up OR dropping someone/something off
    So that Dorian's father-in-law usage there sounds perfectly natural to me, even though we are from opposite corners (practically) of the country.
     
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