{Swing} the baby's hammock

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shop-englishx

Banned
Urdu
Hello,

Is "swing" the right verb here?

Mother is swinging her baby's hammock to-and-fro to cause him to sleep.

Is there any other verb that I can use here?

Please enlighten me on this,

Many thanks.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    The other verb is rocking. The two have similar meanings.

    Usually swinging is used for a hammock (a thing that hangs), and rocking is used for a cradle that has curved legs like a "rocking chair".

    But there is much overlap. A mother can rock her baby to sleep in either a cradle or a hammock.
     

    shop-englishx

    Banned
    Urdu
    Thanks dojibear & Parla,

    Is the use of "to-and-fro" is correct in my OP's sentence? I think it's redundant there as "swing" there conveys the whole meaning, i.e, it tells us about the vibratory motion of the hammock or cradle. right?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    It is quite normal to say redundant things in English. Here adding "to-and-fro" gives a clearer picture of what the mother is doing.

    The word "rocking" implies "to-and-fro", so with that word it is redundant.

    "Swinging" is such a general term that it could mean a variety of actions. For example, standing holding the hammock while turning in a circle, so it "swings" in a circle around you (your hands acting as the frame for the hammock). Most readers will figure out what is meant, but it's easier to just tell them, by adding "to-and-fro".
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I much prefer 'rocking' which suggests gentle movement. 'Swinging' can suggest a bigger movement.

    Think also of the nursery rhyme 'Rock-a-bye baby on the tree top'. (Horrendous ending, though!)
     
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