Switch:

Hello everyone,

Does ''switch'' meaning ''to start doing or using something that is different'' (merriam-webster) sound natural/correct in the examples that I made up below?

a. [In a soccer practice]: I kick and you catch the ball. Okay, now let's switch: You kick the ball and I catch it.
b. Our daughter washed the dishes and our son cleaned the bathroom. But now we switched. Our daughter cleans the bathroom and our son washes the dishes.

Thank you in advance!
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Switch is fine. Especially "Let's switch".

    The second example has some problems that aren't directly related to the use of switch as a concept. You talk about someone else and then say "we switched". It needs some tweaking to sound logical and correct, but that's how switch is used as a concept.
     
    Last edited:

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    For discussion's sake, here's how I would write the second one:

    - Our daughter used to wash the dishes and our son cleaned (or "used to clean") the bathroom. But now they've* switched. Our daughter cleans the bathroom and our son washes the dishes.

    * they have - present perfect
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    All I’m trying to say is that “let’s switch” is not an exclusively American expression.
    No one said it was.
    We're talking about the OP's examples.
    @kentix said it worked in those examples; you said it didn't.
    @Xavier da Silva reasonably concluded that there was a US/UK difference. You said no, it depends on the context.
    It clearly doesn't depend (solely) on the context, since in the same two contexts we've been given, @kentix (and I) accept the usage and you don't.
     
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