swoop in

Annakrutitskaya

Senior Member
Russian
Hello!

Here are two sentences which contain the verb 'to swoop' followed by preposition 'in'. I didn't find 'swoop in' in the list of phrasal verbs. Does 'swoop in' mean 'rush in somewhere suddenly'?

Comex June gold futures shrugged off an overnight retreat to lower levels as gold bulls swooped in to buy on the dip and are supporting the yellow metal Monday morning. (Forbes)

The child eyes Stephen Gardiner; its small mouth turns down. The nurse swoops in before tears ensue (Wolf Hall by H. Mantel)

Thank you!
 
  • I think 'swoop in' is no different from 'fall in(to)' or 'run in(to). "In" suggested going to an area, going inside it.

    "Swoop" is what a hawk does to a prey, or a swallow diving down. The sentences you give are metaphorical, e.g. 'bulls [people] swooping into a market in gold.'

    Swoop could be followed by various propositions: on, onto, in, into, down to, towards, downwards, to [I think]. It depends on who or what is being approached. You could say the nurse 'swooped to' the child, but not 'swooped onto' the child. But, "Seeing bits of bread, the birds swooped onto the deck and ate them."
     

    Annakrutitskaya

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hello, Anna.

    This term often describes the movement of birds, which are said to 'swoop in' to areas where food is to be found. It means to 'move swiftly', 'sweep in',
    Hello, Greyfriar

    Thank you! If it means 'to move sweiftly', can I substitute it for 'to jink' in some sentences? For example:

    Not only can you get up close and personal with the cars as they jink through Piscine, or slow down around the Nouvelle Chicane, but you can stand in the tunnel itself, the most physical experience Formula One has to offer. ESPN F1 (blog) Can cars swoop through Piscine?

    With this strengthened team and a commitment to holding an in/out referendum in 2017, Ed Miliband might yet jink his way into No 10 next year. (Evening Standard) Can this person swoop into No 10 next year?

    Thank you! :)
     

    Annakrutitskaya

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I think 'swoop in' is no different from 'fall in(to)' or 'run in(to). "In" suggested going to an area, going inside it.

    "Swoop" is what a hawk does to a prey, or a swallow diving down. The sentences you give are metaphorical, e.g. 'bulls [people] swooping into a market in gold.'

    Swoop could be followed by various propositions: on, onto, in, into, down to, towards, downwards, to [I think]. It depends on who or what is being approached. You could say the nurse 'swooped to' the child, but not 'swooped onto' the child. But, "Seeing bits of bread, the birds swooped onto the deck and ate them."
    Hello, Benny.
    Thank you! :)
     

    panzerfaust0

    Senior Member
    mandarin
    <-----Threads merged at this point by moderator (Florentia52)----->

    Hello. I am wondering what the phrase "swoop in" means. I know that in a literal sense, it means to move quickly and easily through air, especially down from a height in order to attack. However, I encountered this phrase in a metaphorical way. It was not used to describe birds but humans.

    Context: In Steve Harvey book titled "Straight talk, no chaser" (a book about relationships), he said (paraphrased): "Most men are raised to believe that they should be the protector and provider when it comes to relationships. Very few men dream of having a woman who swoops in and takes care of his livelihood".

    I am guessing "swoop in" in this context probably means to appear suddenly. But I am not sure. Please help.

    Thanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I would say you're right but, even more, in this context, it means unexpectedly. A man doesn't expect that to happen and it would be unusual for a woman to suddenly and unexpectedly appear and tell him she's going to pay for all his bills.
     
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