Syllables In "Machinery"

ayed

Senior Member
Arabic(Saudi)
Hello, folks.
How many syllables does the word"machinery"have?

I think it has three..

Any comments?

Thank you in advance.

Ayed
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I would use four in careful speech. (For me, at least) it is machine + -ery, not -ry. That said, the schwa (weak vowel represented by <e> in this word) is liable to disappear between two such consonants as [n] and [r]. It could easily be three syllables in normal speech.
     

    GDAN

    Senior Member
    english
    There are four syllables that should be heard when speaking "properly". However, there may be some accents (just as in arabic) that may sound like the last vowel is dropped.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    In my version of BE, there are always four syllables, however fast I say the word, the penultimate one containing a schwa or murmur vowel, that does not disappear.
     

    GDAN

    Senior Member
    english
    I can't say anything about the accents in England. In the States however, I have heard the word pronounced as (MA-SHEEN-RY) Don't ask me which state the person was from because I don't remember. I also didn't make any assumptions about the persons education because some Americans have a bad habit of doing just with nothing other than a persons accent as the only determining factor.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    The Grand Ole Opry (Old Opera) in Nashville, Tennessee is another example of this phonetic phenomenon in the States.
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    It really depends on the word. For instance, you'll probably find a vast majority of people pronoucing chocolate as two syllables. Conversely, policeman is more often a three-syllable than a two-syllable word.
    (from what I've heard, that is).
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I was once in a phonology class where we tested our own pronunciations of such words. I couldn't see any logic to what I said. There are some words - among them temperature, general, different - where I cannot use a schwa even in careful speech: it just strikes me as a mispronunciation to add the extra syllable. There are many others where there is an underlying schwa, deletable by a normal phonetic process depending on speech style.
     
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