Synchronous and asynchronous

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Meriem_UK

Banned
German
Hello,


I need to find some synonyme expressions to the following:

Synchronous and asynchronous Motion

Is this correct?

Parallel and not parallel Motion

Symmetric and asymetric motion

But overall Synchronous and asynchronous is usually used to refer to time?

Thanks for you cooperation ;)
 
  • Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    You might try "in step" and "out of step." Parallel and symmetric don't really work as synonyms, because, as you rightly observed, synchronous refers to time (from the Greek Chronos).
     

    Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    We could go on like this forever. Computer systems, digestive systems or office filing systems? They're all fairly dynamic.

    I think you will need to be a bit more layman-orientated with your explanation. I know of lots of "systems" in which things might happen synchronously, but to find a synonym I need to know how it's going to be used. Im Grunde genommen, there is no simple, every-day synonym for synchronous -- that's why everyone uses this complicated Greek word.
     

    Meriem_UK

    Banned
    German
    Well, Thnaks for your reply.

    I am doing a reserach in Robotics. I hav 2 actuators that must be run in parallel to give a vertical translational motion.

    and then in differential mode to give a rotational mode....

    If you passe me your email I could may be send you a more elaborated description with figures, if you wish.
    Like that you get a better idea

    Thanks a lot :)
     

    Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    I don't think I need the pictures; I understand the problem now.
    I would describe the motion exactly as you did in Post #5: in phase and out of phase. But that may be my electronics-background speaking. Parallel certainly does NOT sound right since the actuators are, I suspect, moving more-or-less in parallel (trigonometrically speaking) in both cases.

    If the speed of movement of the actuators is the same in both modes, you could construct a sentence with "delayed" or "offset" to describe the movement of one or the other actuator (or "together" to describe both). "Lead" and "lag" (again from electronics) also come to mind.
    If, however, they start at the same time but move at different speeds to achieve the rotational mode, then I think you should say just that: "same speed" or "different speed".

    In this context, synchronous and asynchronous don't really seem right, since they suggest some recurring action rather than a once-off movement of an actuator.

    Can anyone else offer any help? I'm running out of ideas.
     

    GamblingCamel

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Very instructive thread. I doubt, Lexiphile, that you're going to get much help. It's a very technical vocabulary.

    Merium, are you aware that in everyday English, non-scientists use the terms "in sync" and "out of sync" to describe musical or emotional rhythms?
    It probably make engineers and physicists cringe.
     

    Blues Piano Man

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi Meriem_UK,
    Can you provide context, please? And put the words into a sentence as you might use them?

    That would help cut down on a lot of speculation.

    Thanks,
    Blues :)
     

    Meriem_UK

    Banned
    German
    Thanks,

    well, I have two different motion:

    1. Where the two actuators run in synchronous motion at the same time, each actuator gives a displacement of X1 = X2 = X

    2. Where the two actuators run in synchronous motion at the same time but in a differential mode, each actuator gives a displacement of
    X1 = - X2

    Thanks
     

    Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hi again Meriem,
    That sounds as though they either move in the same direction at the same time or they move in opposite directions at the same time.
    Then I would say that they either move in tandem or they move in opposition.
    Synchronous is clearly not appropriate here.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi again Meriem,
    That sounds as though they either move in the same direction at the same time or they move in opposite directions at the same time.
    Then I would say that they either move in tandem or they move in opposition.
    Synchronous is clearly not appropriate here.
    Synchronous is not appropriate to describe the contrast, but in a technical sense, it might be used to describe the motions, if they are linked together somehow, if they are synchronized in the cases you described.

    If they are not synchronized, they can move in opposition, too. I do not know whether this is for tandem too, but I think, a Tandem is always in a synchronized mode by definition of tandem.

    In dynamical systems, synchronous clearly means, that the movements are coubled in phase, it does not necessarily mean, that the speed is the same (for example, if you have gear wheels.)

    For example, you can control a robot by your movements and the arms of the robot are much larger than yours, they move synchronously, when the shape (the phase) of the movement is the same, not the speed in this special case.

    As Lexiphile wrote, the contrast between synchronous and asynchronous does not fit in the original question.

    In German I would say parallel and antiparallel.

    1. Where the two actuators run in parallel motion with the same speed, each actuator gives a displacement of X1 = X2 = X and the result is a linear motion with a displacement X.

    2. Where the two actuators run in anti-parallel (? opposite) motion with the same speed, the actuators give a displacement of
    X1 = - X2 and the result is a rotating motion.

    3. Where the two actuators run with different speed, the actuators give a resulting linear motion and a rotating motion at the same time.

    ____________________________________________________



    | ------------->
    | ........o..>
    | ------------->

    | ........------------->
    | ................o..> (linear)
    | ........------------->

    ____________________________________________________


    | ....------------->
    | ............o
    | ....<-------------
    |
    | ........------------->
    | ............o....... (rotating)
    | <-------------
     

    Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    If I may assume that antiparallel is a (relative) neologism used in the discussion of vectors, then you may well be right. In trigonometry, lines are either parallel or they are not parallel -- they don't have direction. (I don't think vectors had yet been invented when I was at university :D ) Which all means that there might be some confusion if parallel and antip.. are used. In fact, I've never heard the word until now, even in German.

    Perhaps it would be better to blow the budget and use an extra sentence or two to describe this motion, instead of trying to find words that probably don't exist. If it is necessary to refer to the motion many times in the same document, then we can attach names to the three modes (which you so lucidly described) on the first occurrence and then use only the names.

    How does that sound, Meriem?
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    The main notion is not the term "antiparallel" (which was used during my studies of technology), you can replace it by "opposite" - the essential part is not to forget "with the same speed".

    Then you can use "transport mode", "rotation mode" or something else (native speakers are better in this) as Lexiphilie proposed.
     

    Meriem_UK

    Banned
    German
    Thnaks a lot for your elaborated answers, I will read them later as I am at work now ;)

    @ Lexiphile, are you an engineer?

    @Hutschi, same question, r u an engineer?
     

    Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    I wish I could say "No, I'm a poet" just to put the cat among the pigeons, but yes, I studied electrical engineering and I am now a software engineer. But does it make any difference?
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    I studied electrical engineering, too, especially electronics, and additionally Feingerätetechnik (precision mechanics). I graduated as Diplomingenieur in 1976 at the Technische Universität Dresden. Now I'm working as technical writer and sometimes as poet, too.

    Curriculum Vitae

    A technical writer, oh blast!
    lived backward from future to past,
    he came out of his grave,
    married, played in a cave,
    was born, and aborted at last.

    I hope, it does not make a difference.
     
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