Syrian Arabic: كنت بكوّن الإولاد

Discussion in 'العربية (Arabic)' started by scetis, Feb 5, 2019.

  1. scetis

    scetis Senior Member

    Canada
    English- Canadian
    A friend was telling me about his school days in Syria and how much trouble he used to get in.

    At one point he said " كنت بكوّن الإولاد".

    I had a couple of questions 1) Would this translate as "ّI used to pick fights with the other kids" or "I used to fight with the other kids"? 2) Does this verb in Syrian Arabic (يكوّن) only refer to physical fighting or can it be verbal as well.
     
  2. momai

    momai Senior Member

    Arabic - Syria
    I am not aware of such usage in Syrian Arabic. Are you sure it was بكوّن? It might have been بكوّم, which could probably mean in this particular context that he was able to bring the children together to do something.:confused:
     
  3. She'lock Holmes

    She'lock Holmes Senior Member

    Lebanon > Damascus > Abroad
    Northern Lev. Arabic (mostly Syrian)
    Do you remember what was its broader context?
     
  4. scetis

    scetis Senior Member

    Canada
    English- Canadian
    Hi there, thanks for your replies. I went and double checked with a friend and they said يتكوّن. I asked him multiple times some of my friends are from eastern part of Syria so perhaps it’s a local word in the east? As for the broader context I asked him if he was مشاكس and he said yes then went on to use the above phrase. I’ve also heard it used with husbands and wives.
     
  5. scetis

    scetis Senior Member

    Canada
    English- Canadian
    Update: One of my friends wrote it down and according them it's spelled يتكاون.Not sure if that makes sense?
     
  6. She'lock Holmes

    She'lock Holmes Senior Member

    Lebanon > Damascus > Abroad
    Northern Lev. Arabic (mostly Syrian)
    I am afraid this usage isn't familiar to me. Maybe someone from Iraq could understand it as Eastern Syria is linguistically more 'Iraq-like' than Levantine.
     
  7. Mahaodeh Senior Member

    London, UK
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    I've heard the word يتكاون from our neighbours in Iraq, they were from the western part of Iraq (Ramadi). I didn't really ask what it specifically means but the context implied an argument between two people. I'm mostly familiar with the Baghdad dialect and I don't recall it used in Baghdad.

    Maybe it's local in the western Iraq - eastern Syria region.
     

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