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Thomas1

Senior Member
polszczyzna warszawska
Split from here

Again some off-topic discussion :D

So, šanovat doesn't mean respect in Czech? If I read this word I'd say it means respect someone but there are many 'strange' words ;) that sound similar in Slavic languages and don't mean the same.
Well, if you respect someone you can be considerate for them as well, and all the way around, so maybe there's some similarity (and I shouldn't have corrected you :)). Could you please give some examples in which you would use the word?
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Thomas1 said:
    Again some off-topic discussion :D

    So, šanovat doesn't mean respect in Czech? If I read this word I'd say it means respect someone but there are many 'strange' words ;) that sound similar in Slavic languages and don't mean the same.
    Well, if you respect someone you can be considerate for them as well, and all the way around, so maybe there's some similarity (and I shouldn't have corrected you :)). Could you please give some examples in which you would use the word?
    Šanovat does not mean anything in Czech. I only know it from my grandmother's dialect inspired by Polish. She used it like "to spare someone" (to prevent someone from experiencing something embarassing, unpleasant, hurtful).

    Jana
     

    Tchesko

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Jana337 said:
    Šanovat does not mean anything in Czech. I only know it from my grandmother's dialect inspired by Polish. She used it like "to spare someone" (to prevent someone from experiencing something embarassing, unpleasant, hurtful).

    Jana
    The word might be more widespread than that, Jana. I know it from a folk song from South Moravia...

    Roman
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Thanks, Roman. :)
    Would you say it means "to protect" or "to respect" in the song? I lean towards the former.

    Jana
     

    Tchesko

    Senior Member
    Czech
    To say the truth, I couldn't make up my mind...

    However, this "Moravian-Czech dictionary" :) makes me lean towards "to spare", "to protect", "to look after"... and seemingly also "to pity" ("litovat, šetřit, opatrovat")...

    But the sense of "šanovat" is definitely subject to (mis)interpretation: there are discussions on that matter on the internet; it is a substandard word, so its meaning might be not-so-well codified.

    Now, I found here some etymological stuff: "šanovat" stems from the German verb "schonen", and its meaning is "to spare someone", "to protect someone" and... "to respect someone" ("mít ohled na", for lack of better translation ~ "to have regard for someone", "to take one's motives into consideration").

    So, generally speaking, I tend to think that both "to protect" and "to respect" are acceptable.
    In the song, I first thought I would replace it with "opatrovat", i.e. "to protect" / "to look after". But in that case, the use of the conjunction "ale" ("but") in the song looks weird to me... That's why, in my humble opinion, the song says rather "I would spare her during the day" (a bit like a scarce resource) ;) ... "but love her during the night"!

    Roman
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    Tchesko said:
    Now, I found here some etymological stuff: "šanovat" stems from the German verb "schonen", and its meaning is "to spare someone", "to protect someone" and... "to respect someone" ("mít ohled na", for lack of better translation ~ "to have regard for someone", "to take one's motives into consideration").
    Really? It is of Germanic origin?? How interesting!!

    It's quite a common word in Belarussian. "Шанаваць" means "to have/show respect for, to honour smn/smth". Its derivatives are also widely used, i.e. they usually say "шаноўнае спадарства" when addressing the audience. (Compare for example: Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren.)

    Tchesko said:
    In the song, I first thought I would replace it with "opatrovat", i.e. "to protect" / "to look after". But in that case, the use of the conjunction "ale" ("but") in the song looks weird to me... That's why, in my humble opinion, the song says rather "I would spare her during the day" (a bit like a scarce resource) ;) ... "and love her during the night"!
    :) An original thought! :)

    Still, I would suggest a slightly different variant:

    "I would honour her by day and caress her in the night" ;)
     
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