Ta’e the thick wi’ th’ thin. This wor a bit o’ thin for once

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(the ninth line, page 253, chapter 12) by Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background:the following words are describes what happened after the sexual intercourse between Connie and Mellors )

His words were small comfort. She(Connie) sobbed aloud.

‘Nay, nay!’ he(Mellors) said. ‘Ta’e the thick wi’ th’ thin. This wor a bit o’ thin for once.’

I can guess the part is: take the thick with thin. This were(maybe was) a bit of(I feel the of is redundant) thin for once.
But what's the meaning of take the thick with thin please?

Thank you in advance
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Take the thick with the thin = Take the good with the bad.

    Yes, "This was a bit of the thin for once (for a change)."
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you.
    Take the thick with the thin = Take the good with the bad.

    Yes, "This was a bit of the thin for once (for a change)."
    Doe the thick stand for the good, and the thin for the bad?
    If so, I understand the second sentence to mean:this time, we experienced something bad for a change.
    Note: 'of' is not redundant. I had a little bit of flu yesterday. :tick:
    Yes, if thin equals the thin.
     
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