-tai to omoimasu

Esoppe

Member
Turkish
I keep hearing this in Japanese videos where somebody is explaining a process, or giving an outline of something; like: "konkai wa sakana wo yaitai to omoimasu". This construction should literally mean "I think I want to do <verb>". Yet, this sounds rather unnatural in these contexts (at least in languages I speak). What is the reason that Japanese use this format so much? Does it act as an extra degree of formality or politeness?
 
  • 810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    "konkai wa sakana wo yakitai to omoimasu".
    This time we are going to grill fish
    Yes it does in the literal sense, but it commonly means(is translated as, I guess) I'm going to do, I will be doing or something else, implying that we will have some time to do that from this time on.
     

    DaylightDelight

    Senior Member
    Japanese - Tokyo
    "-tai to omoimasu" is colloquially used to express some kind of modesty.
    I think it implies something like "I think I want to do <something>. Is that okay with you?"
    Some people use it to be polite, but some people do flown on this usage because it sounds kind of evasive.
    I personally don't use it in formal occasions.
     

    frequency

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Yes it does in the literal sense, but it commonly means(is translated as, I guess) I'm going to do, I will be doing or something else, implying that we will have some time to do that from this time on.
    Yes! And that's very usual and polite speech. You're mentioning what you're going to do (from) now. I recommend you use it.
     
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