tailor

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Rainbowlight

Member
Spanish
Hello,

I would like to know if there are other translations for the word "tailor" in Arabic other than the word "خياط". Maybe there are other synonyms that have the same meaning.

I would also like to know if the root for "خياط" is somehow linked to verbs such as "to sew", "to adjust", "to fit" or "to cut and assemble pieces".

Thank you in advance.

Kind regards.
Fiz
 
  • ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    Hello,

    I would like to know if there are other translations for the word "tailor" in Arabic other than the word "خياط". Maybe there are other synonyms that have the same meaning.
    ناصح
    ناصِحِيٌّ
    نَصَّاحٌ

    خائط
    I would also like to know if the root for "خياط" is somehow linked to verbs such as "to sew", "to adjust", "to fit" or "to cut and assemble pieces".
    Yes, the root is خاط
    Thank you in advance.

    Kind regards.
    Fiz
     

    akhooha

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    there is also ترزي tarzi, but this may be only Egyptian Arabic.
    P.S. I have never heard of ناصح with the meaning of tailor ---- is it maybe Najdi dialect?
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    I never heard ناصح with that meaning either. But the other word I know is حائك from the verb حاك يَحيك حِياكة while خيّاط and خائط are from خاط يَخيط خِياطة.
     

    Rainbowlight

    Member
    Spanish
    I am trying to jot down all those synonyms. Unfortunately, I don's speak Arabic at all, which makes it difficult for me to understand how these words are pronounced. Sometimes I try to use the Forvo website to have a clearer idea of the sounds of the word.

    One more question: Is there any connection, however tenuous, between the word used in Arabic for "tailor" and the Arabic word for "size" (as in "clothes size").
    there is also ترزي tarzi, but this may be only Egyptian Arabic.
    P.S. I have never heard of ناصح with the meaning of tailor ---- is it maybe Najdi dialect?
    Would you be so kind as to tell me which root does "tarzi" stem from? To sew? String? Thread? To cut? To size?
    Thank you so very much.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    One more question: Is there any connection, however tenuous, between the word used in Arabic for "tailor" and the Arabic word for "size" (as in "clothes size").
    Not that I know of. The words come from the verbs that mean to sew.
    Would you be so kind as to tell me which root does "tarzi" stem from? To sew? String? Thread? To cut? To size?
    It's not an Arabic word, it's a loanword, maybe from Turkish?
     

    fenakhay

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Morocco) / French (France)
    There is طرز and تطريز in Morocco (and also in MSA) but they are specifically used for embroidery.
     

    Rainbowlight

    Member
    Spanish
    There is طرز and تطريز in Morocco (and also in MSA) but they are specifically used for embroidery.
    Thanks for the information. However, I actually was wondering if there is a connection between several words related to tailoring.

    In French, there is the word "tailleur", which is the common word used to refer to tailors. But watch out: "taille" also means "waist" and, of course, "taille" means "size" too, as in "clothes size". "Tailleur" may also mean "the one who cuts", referring to the employee in a tailor's shop who would cut the fabric, even if it was the "Sarto/Sastre/Sartre" who actually sew the garment.

    I was wondering if this phenomenon takes place in other languages too, especially in Arabic.
     
    Last edited:

    djara

    Senior Member
    Tunisia Arabic
    تارزي comes utlimately from Persian where the word darz means:

    "1) درز darz, A joint, the joining of the skull, a suture, a seam; a rent in a garment which has been sewed up; young girls; [darzi iklīlī, Fronto-parietal suture (anat.); — darzi sinina, Dove-tailed margin of the sutures of the skull; — darzi sahmi, Parietal suture; — darzi qishrī, Temporo-parietal suture; — darzi lāmī, Occipital suture; — darz kardan, To split, to be rent; (met.) to become public, to be divulged;] — daraz, Mustachios." (Steingass)

    and the word darzi means:
    درزى darzī, A tailor. (Steingass)
     

    Abbe

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    Thanks for the information. However, I actually was wondering if there is a connection between several words related to tailoring.

    In French, there is the word "tailleur", which is the common word used to refer to tailors. But watch out: "taille" also means "waist" and, of course, "taille" means "size" too, as in "clothes size". "Tailleur" may also mean "the one who cuts", referring to the employee in a tailor's shop who would cut the fabric, even if it was the "Sarto/Sastre/Sartre" who actually sew the garment.

    I was wondering if this phenomenon takes place in other languages too, especially in Arabic.
    I don't know if someone has said this but the word خياط is related to the word thread خيط (khayt)
    مخيط means needle (mikhyat)
    خياطة is sewing, dressmaking (khiyaata)
     

    Rainbowlight

    Member
    Spanish
    تارزي comes utlimately from Persian where the word darz means:

    "1) درز darz, A joint, the joining of the skull, a suture, a seam; a rent in a garment which has been sewed up; young girls; [darzi iklīlī, Fronto-parietal suture (anat.); — darzi sinina, Dove-tailed margin of the sutures of the skull; — darzi sahmi, Parietal suture; — darzi qishrī, Temporo-parietal suture; — darzi lāmī, Occipital suture; — darz kardan, To split, to be rent; (met.) to become public, to be divulged;] — daraz, Mustachios." (Steingass)

    and the word darzi means:
    درزى darzī, A tailor. (Steingass)
    Many thanks for all the information. I was thinking about how several meanings overlap when we talk about the French word "tailleur". There's the verb "tailler", which means "to cut". Then there's the word "taille", which stands for "waist". And finally, there's "taille", which stands for "size". All these three words are clearly part of the vocabulary that is used in the trade and each one of them express a side of the work of the "tailleur": cutting fabric, seizing the human body to get a set of measurements which will probably coalesce into a standard size and get just the right mensuration of the client's waist . Just as an Italian "Sarto" is the one who "sutures", the "one who sews".

    I was just curious about this phenomenon and wanted to know if the word in question (darzi, in this case) is also polysemic or somehow overlaps other similar words that, when inspected closely, are also related to the tailor's trade.
     
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