take a chill pill is something an American would use naturally?

Watch123

Senior Member
Spanish & Valencian
Hello,
I'd like to know if the expression "take a chill pill" is something an American would say it naturally in the situations where you can use it.
I heard it in the UK but I'm curious about in the US.

Many thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:
  • Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    We would understand what it meant. But it would sound a bit rude in Canada! It sounds more like something that would be said in a comedy TV show. It might be OK in a very jokey group of young people but I would not use it among adults or in a serious situation.

    Note also the implication that the person needs to take a tranquilizer. That could be insulting.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I'd like to know if the expression "take a chill pill" is something an American would say it naturally in the situations where you can use it.
    I used to hear that little phrase every now and then, but I get the idea that its popularity has waned considerably in the last three or four decades. I'm not particularly jokey or young, but I wouldn't find it insulting if you used it in a conversation with me because you thought that I was being too emotional or dramatic about some unimportant thing.
     
    Last edited:

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I agree. I don't think many people would say that even though just about everyone would understand it. It sounds like outdated slang. You'd be much more likely to hear "chill out" than that (although that might be a bit old, too).
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    This sounds like 1980s slang. It also sounds like a hippie talking to a normal person. "You're upset because I broke the law? Releax. Take a chill pill."

    I don't think it was used in normal situations, by normal people speaking to other normal people who are upset. It is condescending (you are "talking down" to the person you say this to).
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top