take a flying jump

minhduc

Senior Member
vietnamese
Hi all, please explain to me the meaning of "take a flying jump." It's from Love letters by Katie Fforde.

The context is: a famous writer is invited to a literature festival. He agrees but he wants to keep it secret. But unfortunately the news is out and he texts this message to the woman who is running the festival: "Your festival can take a flying jump."

Thanks.
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    to take a flying jump
    to take a flying leap
    to (go) take a hike

    They are ways of expressing:
    Go away.
    Get out of my sight.
    Get away from me.
    I don't want to have anything to do with you.

    The writer is saying to the woman: I don't want to have anything to do with your festival.

    I hope someone else can explain better. It's basically telling someone/something to go jump off a cliff, and get a flying start, so you fall especially hard.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I think it is a euphemistic form of :warn: "take a flying fuck", :warn: which primarily serves as a very disdainful (and vulgar) way of telling someone that you don't care what they do as long as they go away and don't bother you.

    In this story, the writer has substituted words no one will object to, but the person he says it to will understand what what words he had in mind.

    Here is a relevant thread: Flying Fuck
     

    mr cat

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think it's as perpend says, I would more usually hear 'take a running jump'. Also I would suggest that cagey's version is a vulgar form of the original rather than 'flying jump' being a euphemism! Especially since the author is English and I've never heard the other version used here in the UK.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Also, "take a flying leap at the moon" is quite common, so I also tend to think that this came first and was then "vulgarified". :) Etymonline doesn't have a direct listing for "flying leap" but it mentions that a meaning of "flyer" dated to 1846 is "(on the notion of a "flying leap")".
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Yes, I'd originally heard it as "flying leap"—actually, "take a flying leap into a rolling doughnut" (which I cannot explain; it may have been regional)—and heard the "flying fuck" version only later.
     

    shawnee

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    I'm not familiar with the 'take a .....' form of this expression. I've only heard, and probably uttered, 'I couldn't give a flying fuck'.
     

    VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Also, "take a flying leap at the moon" is quite common, so I also tend to think that this came first and was then "vulgarified".
    I have just heard this phrase in a Twilight Zone episode (with "jump" instead of "leap"). I'd like to ask if it (literally) means to jump so high as to reach the Moon (from the Earth)?
    Thanks.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I have just heard this phrase in a Twilight Zone episode (with "jump" instead of "leap"). I'd like to ask if it (literally) means to jump so high as to reach the Moon (from the Earth)?
    Thanks.
    The phrase is generally "at the moon" not "to the moon" so it literally suggests that you should attempt it, not that you should accomplish it.
     

    VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The phrase is generally "at the moon" not "to the moon" so it literally suggests that you should attempt it, not that you should accomplish it.
    But what does "at" particularly mean here? If it's not "to", then it means take a flying leap while standing on the Moon?
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    But what does "at" particularly mean here? If it's not "to", then it means take a flying leap while standing on the Moon?
    No - because even if I were able to get to the moon, my text message to the folks back home wouldn't say "I am at the moon". As others have implied, "a flying leap at the moon" doesn't need to make much sense, because we all know what it means in practice.

    If you really want to know the meaning of every word rather than the overall meaning of the expression, I suppose you could compare it with "The dog leapt at me", in which "at me" means "towards me", "in my direction".
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It has no logical meaning so don't waste your time looking for analysis. It's very rude without actually using taboo words.
    My version would be "Take a long walk off a short pier!".
     
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