take a haircut

  • sayah

    Senior Member
    Spain. Spanish
    Significa que tiene que converle de que necesita cortarse el pelo. Se utiliza el "take" para decir que tiene que cortarse el pelo (pero es una acción que lleva a cabo otra persona por él/ella)
     

    carpve

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    gracias
    pero dudo mucho que tu interpretacion sea acertada
    Es en el ambito laboral y es un sentido figurado, por eso lo pregunto
     

    Polopino

    Senior Member
    British English
    The context is " she has to convince her bosses to take a haircut"

    What it does mean?
    Thanks
    I'm afraid it's not very good English in my opinion. We use the verbs 'get', 'need' or 'have' with haircut, not 'take'.

    Furthermore the sentence construction leaves the meaning ambiguous. Does it mean she has to convince her bosses that they should have a haircut, or does it mean that she has to convince her bosses that she needs a haircut?
     

    jpmaher

    Member
    usa, english
    Take a haircut ~ get a haircut. There's not only grammar involved here but ethnicity and context of situation, too.

    On "take a" and get a" in authentic, non-ethnic English:
    if someone serves you and you paid for it, say "I got it". You probably paid and someone else was involved.

    If you did "it" yourself and it has some effect on you (walking, bathing, urinating etc.) and no one else was involved in the operation, you say "I took a(n) X".

    When I was a kid, I discovered that some of my words were not English. We called an idiot an "amadan" (diacritics omitted). Not until school chums from other neighborhoods looked at me in a funny way did I realize the word I had used was Irish.
    Our Italians said "spaghettis are good"; we didn't know spaghetti is a plural in Italian. My French Canadian, Italian. Polish and Slovak classmates "opened" and "closed" the radio and the lights; we turned them on or off.

    When I went south of Harrisburg (Pennsylvania) Appalachian folk were "waitin' on" traffic to clear up. We would wait FOR something. Only in the restaurant and the store did we northerners get waited on. When I went in the army I heard for the first time "that's where it's at". We said "... where it is". You hear this Mid-Westernism on the BBC now.

    My Ukrainian and Slovak neighbors said they "got a bath". We took a bath (or walk, nap, jump, hike, shower, pee, sh_t.)

    Later I heard my Jewish neighbors in Chicago say "it makes me crazy"; we said it drives/drove us crazy. Now radio & TV faces from all backgrounds are unwittingly using the Jewish phrase. Chicago Jews also say "I took a shave, an X-ray. a haircut'; non-Jews would say "I got a haircut, an X-ray" etc.

    In 1900 Jews in America could get work in fields like peddling and entertainment (vaudeville / music hall e.g.), while they were often excluded from other work. Consequently a Yiddish word for a theater performance is used by all Americans who work in the performance business: "shtick" (= German [Theater]- Stueck", piece de theatre...). Chutzpah, bagels, lox are not known in the plains of Kansas.

    Now I come to the point. If you grew up Jewish in America the "default" or "unmarked" expression is "he's gonna take a haircut", and can be employed metaphorically for a trimming of another sort, where you lose something very much a part of you.

    Add to this the fact that on Wall Street, where Jews are now well represented, words from the stetl are adventitiously understood as banking terms. -- On 20 November 2008, at age 75, I heard a news report on the radio that Mr Reich said that the geniuses responsible for the Wall Street mess are going to be stripped of some of their exorbitant salaries and bonuses; "they're going to take a hair cut."

    From their delivery it was obvious that the Anglo newsreaders were a bit perplexed. It was the first time I heard "take a haircut" spoken outside a Jewish neighborhood.
     

    jpmaher

    Member
    usa, english
    Besides "take a haircut":
    When you are charged exorbitant fees by a lawyer or you you lose everything in a divorce, a good expression is "they took me to the cleaners". (Limpieza quimica, chemische Reinigung...)
     

    GMoPRO

    New Member
    English
    I'm afraid it's not very good English in my opinion. We use the verbs 'get', 'need' or 'have' with haircut, not 'take'.

    Furthermore the sentence construction leaves the meaning ambiguous. Does it mean she has to convince her bosses that they should have a haircut, or does it mean that she has to convince her bosses that she needs a haircut?

    Wrong. It means accept less money for something. It is a phrase... take a haircut. Nothing to do with getting your hair trimmed. Nothing at all to do with that.

    SEE ... https://www.waywordradio.org/take_a_haircut/
    accepting less value than something is worth.
    This has nothing to do with poor grammar. That is incorrect. It is not poor grammar.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top