take a job interview

meijin

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, I see the following sentence in a questionnaire (sent to me for proofreading) translated from Japanese into English and am wondering if "take" is the right verb.

I want to work in Japan, but I don't know if I can take the job interviews in English.

I couldn't find "take + interview" in any of the dictionaries I checked.
 
  • meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you very much for the reply, HGT. So, "take + interview" is all right, at least in AmE.

    How about you BE speakers? Do you agree?
     
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    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Some (many?) native speakers say "take a survey" should be "take part in a survey" or "participate in a survey". So I wondered if they also consider "take an interview" not very good, but it seems fine.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you both. One of the English-Japanese dictionaries I use says "have" is the right verb. Do you agree?

    I want to work in Japan, but I don't know if I can have the job interviews in English.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    (Yes, 'have' is possible, but to me, weaker and not as explicit as HGT's suggestions.)
    I'm aware that the two alternatives HGT suggested are correct and idiomatic, but I'd also like to know what verb works in the "I can _____ the job interviews in English" word order. The Collins dictionary I use shows the following example: "They are not able to get a job interview because they have no fixed address". Does this mean "get" also works in my example? I think it's stronger than "have".

    I want to work in Japan, but I don't know if I can get the job interviews in English.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I'd also like to know what verb works in the "I wonder if I can _____ the job interviews in English" word order.
    A job interview is a process. It is something you do or perform, and something you undergo. But it's tricky finding a verb to put in the blank.

    "Take" won't work. Using "take" for "take a test" only works for tests. We don't use "take" for other processes.

    You want a sentence written from the interviewee's point of view: the interviewee _____s the job interview. If the sentence has the interviewer(s) as the subject, the verb conduct is used. An employer conducts an interview. So you can use a passive sentence like this:

    "I wonder if I can have the job interview conducted in English".

    You can also use the universal vague action verb "to do". It is acceptable, though a little clumsy:

    "I wonder if I can do the job interview in English".
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    So the Collins dictionary's example "They are not able to get a job interview because they have no fixed address" doesn't work in AmE (I've just realized that everyone who has replied so far is from the US).
    How about you BE speakers? (Most of them are still sleeping around this time, I suppose.)
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    So the Collins dictionary's example "They are not able to get a job interview because they have no fixed address" doesn't work in AmE
    That sentence works fine in AmE. Maybe it doesn't mean what you think.

    Here "get a job interview" means "set up an appointment for a job interview". It's an important step: most companies will read your resume, but are not willing to interview you. If you "got" an interview with Telco, they have agreed to interview you.

    That is why "no fixed address" is in the example sentence. It implies that companies are not willing to interview someone who has no fixed address.

    If you "had" an interview with Telco, they interviewed you. Different meaning.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Yes, I can now see why "get" works in the Collins' example but not in mine.
    It's interesting that "take", and also "receive" according to a dictionary I've just checked, work with "test" (e.g. blood test) but don't work with "interview".
     
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