take a listing

novice_81

Senior Member
German
Hi

A cetain couple was looking for a house to buy.
They went to the real estate office and met with a salesman. They told him on which street they wanted to buy their new house. He said: "Hold on. I took a listing on that street this morning".

--- Does it just mean that he, that morning, put on his list the houses at that street which were for sale?
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    No, a listing is an offer to sell. The realtor lists the property for sale. It means that he has taken on the task of representing that property for sale. He is the property owner's agent now.
     

    novice_81

    Senior Member
    German
    Hi

    Ok, but how can I say, in a different way the same thing:
    I took a listing on that street this morning MAYBE This morning I prepared a house for sale at that street.

    What do you think?

    Well, actually now I think it means what you've written above: This morning I've taken on myself the task of selling this property. Am I correct?
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It means that this morning the owner of the house agreed to let the agent represent the owner in selling the house. "Listing" is real estate agent jargon, not everyday speech.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    You changed what you wrote above :) so I don't know what was there before.
    The agent doesn't just see a random house while driving down the street and decide to "take on himself the task of selling it."
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    I don't think that 'I've taken on myself' is correct here since the salesman has been given the job by someone else.
    I would say 'I've been appointed to sell this property'/'I've been put in charge of selling....'
     

    novice_81

    Senior Member
    German
    Hi

    Even if someone is appointed to do something he/she first has to agree to do it, so in a way he/she has to take this task on himself/herself.

    That's how I see it.

    Thanks
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    If he is a salesman employed by an estate agent, he doesn't really have the option of refusing the appointment....
    He would 'take it on himself' perhaps if he was acting without his employer's permission but I don't think that this is the case in your example.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    If he is a salesman employed by an estate agent, he doesn't really have the option of refusing the appointment....
    He would 'take it on himself' perhaps if he was acting without his employer's permission but I don't think that this is the case in your example.
    Real estate works so differently in different places. In many places in the U.S. the agent is an independent businessperson under the auspices of a broker. The agent has the right to refuse a listing, at least here in California, because the agent must lay out money for listings, advertising, open houses and such. If he doesn't think it's a good investment he may not take on the listing.

    Here's an interesting article on the topic:

    http://www.walletpop.com/blog/2010/03/04/realty-agents-not-always-showing-the-listing-love/
     
    Last edited:

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Thanks for the aclaration! :)
    I still consider that 'take it on myself' is the wrong phrase here though, to me it sounds as if the person speaking is over-reaching his authority in some way.
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    Thanks for the aclaration! :)
    I still consider that 'take it on myself' is the wrong phrase here though, to me it sounds as if the person speaking is over-reaching his authority in some way.
    Aclaration is a word? (That's a genuine question, not sarcasm!)

    Does no-one else think, meaning aside, that "this morning I've taken on myself the task of selling this property" just sounds awkward? If I saw that sentence, I would be tempted to rephrase as "this morning I've personally taken on the task of selling this property" or "this morning I've taken it upon myself to sell this property" (although I also think the present perfect seems a bit weird there).
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Thanks for the aclaration! :)
    I still consider that 'take it on myself' is the wrong phrase here though, to me it sounds as if the person speaking is over-reaching his authority in some way.
    I think you might mean "clarification". :)

    As I said above, it depends on where the agent is located. In many states in the U.S. the real estate agent is a licensed independent agent who works under the "umbrella" of a broker but he is not by any means an employee. He sets his own hours, is paid totally on commission, is responsible for all the paperwork involved in the transaction and receives no salary. In fact, he pays the broker a portion of his commission from the sale.
     
    Last edited:

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Aclaration is a word? (That's a genuine question, not sarcasm!)

    Does no-one else think, meaning aside, that "this morning I've taken on myself the task of selling this property" just sounds awkward? If I saw that sentence, I would be tempted to rephrase as "this morning I've personally taken on the task of selling this property" or "this morning I've taken it upon myself to sell this property" (although I also think the present perfect seems a bit weird there).
    Yes, I like your modified versions better, although here (in California) it would not quite be accurate. When an agent takes a listing he actually signs an agreement with the seller to list the property. It's a legal agreement, not a task. It would be more accurate in California to translate it as "This morning I signed an agreement to represent the owners of this property in any sale of the property".
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hi

    A certain couple was looking for a house to buy.
    They went to the real estate office and met with a salesman. They told him on which street they wanted to buy their new house. He said: "Hold on. I took a listing on that street this morning".

    --- Does it just mean that he, that morning, put on his list the houses at that street which were for sale?
    I'm not sure what changes have taken place since the first posting of this question, but it seems very clear to me.

    This couple want to buy a house on X street.
    The salesman responds, telling them that just this morning someone who owns a house on X street has engaged him to sell their house.

    This could be the couple's lucky day :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top