Take a lot of a risk

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Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

Does the phrase "take a lot of a risk" (= the chances that something bad will happen are very high - my definition) sound natural/correct in the example I made below?

Anna, you're taking a lot of a risk by drinking and driving. Besides having an accident, you could be caught by the police.

Thank you in advance!
 
  • RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    You mean I should say "take a lot of risk"? But I've seen native speakers use "take too much of a risk", "take a bit of a risk", "not take much of a risk".
    The basic phrase is: You are taking a risk. If you put a lot of in front of it you drop the "a". I would really have to analyze why "a lot of" changes the usage. It seems to change the noun from a count noun to a non-count noun. There is a cow in the field. You have a lot of "cow" in the stew.

    Maybe others can help.
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Thank you for your answer.

    It seems that the article "a" isn't used when "a lot of" is involved, for example (as said above), "take a lot of risk" (without "a"). But the article "a" is possible in cases like "take a bit of a risk", "take too much of a risk", "not take much of a risk". I wonder why.

    I hope somebody else can help clarify that.
     
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