take a pounding on the rocks

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
take a pounding
to be hit or attacked many times and often badly damaged:
The ship had taken a pounding on the rocks.
Longman dictionary

Does that mean the ship hit the same rocks many times?
Thank you.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I don't think repetition is an essential feature of the expression, just bad damage. You could say the ship took a pounding when it hit the rocks, which more clearly makes it a single event. (I think waves pounding on the shore is a distracting image here.) We say the euro took a pounding on the financial markets, or a sports team took a pounding; these come from continuing events, not abrupt ones, but there's no particular sense of repetition.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I don't think repetition is an essential feature of the expression, just bad damage. You could say the ship took a pounding when it hit the rocks, which more clearly makes it a single event. (I think waves pounding on the shore is a distracting image here.) We say the euro took a pounding on the financial markets, or a sports team took a pounding; these come from continuing events, not abrupt ones, but there's no particular sense of repetition.
    Thank you.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Wrongman is not noted for providing good examples, but I take it that the ship was stuck on the rocks and waves were pounding against it.

    "Waves," "ship" and "pounding" are frequently collocated.

    See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave_pounding

    Or this news story: http://abcnews.go.com/US/antarctic-cruise-ship-cleila-ii-slammed-waves-drake/story?id=12363611

    On Dec. 7, while returning from the Antarctic, 30- to 40-foot waves pounded the ship as it passed through the Drake Passage, an area known for its rough seas. The waves knocked out communications on the ship and partially disabled the ship's engine.
     
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