Take a rest or have some rest

  • thrice

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    If you're telling someone to rest after a long day's work, "have some rest" seems more appropriate. One might say "take a rest" when you mean "from" something, as in "take a rest from your work and come have lunch with me". They seem pretty similar to me, with just a few minor nuances.
     

    sailingbikeruk

    New Member
    English, England
    This is interesting, I cannot think of a sentence where the phrase "take a rest" would be used. Surely you would take a break from your work to have lunch.

    You can "have a rest" so you could say "why don't you have a rest from all this work and come have lunch with me"

    Sinimilarly in the first person it wold be more common to hear someone say "I am going to have a rest"

    It would be my opinion that to have a rest would be more accurate than to take a rest.

    Ian
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    Interesting. Where I've lived (Illinois and Massachusetts), we neither take nor have a rest, we simply rest: "Why don't you rest now?" We do, however, take a break in order to rest. ;)

    Elisabetta
     

    irrinna

    New Member
    Ukrainian
    hi, everybody.

    can I say - have rest?
    or it's always necessary to say - have a rest?

    thanks :)
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    'Take a nap' and 'take a break' make sense in general for any activity, but to me 'take a rest' is what you do when you stop doing something that was making you sweat or breathe heavily. as in "Take a rest, Felicia, you don't need to get all the firewood stacked today."
    But "Take a break, Felicia, those datasets will not go anywhere."
     

    irrinna

    New Member
    Ukrainian
    So, I have to say - have a rest

    in this case, as I understand, this sentence I was taught at school is not right

    'I go to the sea to have rest every summer '

    It should be 'I go to the sea to rest every summer'
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    I can easily imagine saying 'I go to ---- to get/have some rest every summer. I wouldn't say 'to rest every summer,' though.
     
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