Take care [=good-bye/ used?]

< Previous | Next >

JACES

Member
Japanese
When I lived in the United States 20 years ago, (young) people used "Take care." when they parted. So since I came to New Zealand last year, I have used it ocassionally. However, older people's response has not been so good. It might be just my imagination, though. I am wondering if it has a bit of negative meaning or connotation included or if it is only used by young people. I'm now in my late 40's.
 
  • Languagethinkerlover

    Senior Member
    English-British and U.S.
    When I lived in the United States 20 years ago, (young) people used "Take care." when they parted. So since I came to New Zealand last year, I have used it ocassionally. However, older people's response has not been so good. It might be just my imagination, though. I am wondering if it has a bit of negative meaning or connotation included or if it is only used by young people. I'm now in my late 40's.

    I advise you to ask the people you say that to if it offends them. I don't see why it would offend them. And then ask why it offends them.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Perhaps there is a perception among old people that you think they're feeble and need to watch their step. :) It will be interesting to hear their responses to your question.
     

    JACES

    Member
    Japanese
    Perhaps there is a perception among old people that you think they're feeble and need to watch their step. :) It will be interesting to hear their responses to your question.
    Thank you very much for your explanation. I am wondering if the phrase still has the connotation that you should be careful. I still remember how a lady in her 60's responsed, saying "OK." with a strange smile, when I said to her "Take care" when she started to drive her car to her friend's house at night. I think your interpretation is correct.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top