Take care of you

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vesperlynd

Member
French (Québec, Canada)
Is there an expression in Italian, that people write at the end of a message or say at the end of a phone call, that means "take care of you"..

Prenda la cura ??? It seems weird ?
 
  • Azazel81

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    I suppose you're talking about the expression used at the end of a communication "take care", rather than "take care of you". In Italian that would sound quite weird, but I saw the difference with my girlfriend (who's not Italian) when she kept saying "take care".

    In Italian we say: "stammi bene".

    If you say "take care of you" I suppose someone would say the subject is missing, probably... as in "I'll take care of you".

    EDIT: beatrice76, I can tell you we use it too (I'm from Milan).
     
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    vesperlynd

    Member
    French (Québec, Canada)
    The expression "stammi bene" is usually used with everybody we are speaking to or only with friends and family?
     

    tastieranera

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Another way to translate it might be: "Riguardati". In this case you really mean "Take good care of yourself", for instance if the person has a cold.
    Otherwise "stammi bene" would be the corresponding form of "take care".
    For formal relationships: "Stia bene" or "Si riguardi".
     
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    Azazel81

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    I would say:
    stai bene! (it's colloquial, it's better by phone) wouldn't we say "stammi bene"? (or in a more formal way "stia bene")
    Abbi cura di te (more formal)
    And here I thought it was the other way around.

    I think both "abbi cura di te" and "stammi bene" are quite informal.. you say these to people you know, to friends, relatives and stuff...

    To your boss, or to a client you would rather say: "tante buone/belle cose" or "(mi) stia bene".
     
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