Take charge

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Carlospalmar

Senior Member
Spanish, Argentina
Hello,

I am confused about both meaning and scope of usage of the following: take charge of something for example things one has said or done. Take charge of someone. Can this include "emotional" care such as emotional, spiritual support, understanding as well as financial? Or you need a different expression for financial taking charge.?
1. Is correct to say: He would not take charge of his rude remarks and appologize for his rudness.
2. After his father passed away, Tom took charge of his elderly mother.(here emotional support, understanding, as well as financial support. He also took charge of the family business. (this is a different meaning)
My confusion might be caused by Spanish interferance.
Any and all corrections and/or clarification to help me will be appreciated.

Later,

C.
 
  • tomandjerryfan

    Senior Member
    English (Canada)
    For sentence 1, assuming that you're not referring to two people, I would suggest "admit to." In sentence 2, "take charge" is fine.

    He would not admit to his rude remarks and apologize for his rudeness.
    After his father passed away, Tom took charge of his elderly mother.
     

    tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    To take charge is used in different ways. If you are the leader of a group, you take charge and everyone must follow your instructions. To take charge of a person means that you will look after that person. To take charge financially means that you will be responsible for managing your finances well. You would not take charge of rude remarks. That would be to take the blame or accept responsibility for, depending on the context.
    You take charge of things by being responsible for them, but it is not always the right expression to use. Now I have confused myself and will take the blame for confusing you.
     

    Carlospalmar

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Argentina
    For sentence 1, assuming that you're not referring to two people, I would suggest "admit to." In sentence 2, "take charge" is fine.

    He would not admit to his rude remarks and apologize for his rudeness.
    After his father passed away, Tom took charge of his elderly mother.
    Thank you for your explantion on take charge. I have another question. It is about word partnership or more technically collocation.

    Take charge does not seem to collocate with remarks. This is what I have just learned from your explation. What about actions, things one does typically bad things, things that cause displeasure, anger, financial problems, etc. to other people, embarrasment, etc. Would take charge combine or collocate with actions such us leaving the window open, forgetting to send an invitation to a friend or relative, etc. Or I need to use "admit to doing those things? How about take the blame?
    Thanks again for your help.
    Later
    C.
     

    Carlospalmar

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Argentina
    To take charge is used in different ways. If you are the leader of a group, you take charge and everyone must follow your instructions. To take charge of a person means that you will look after that person. To take charge financially means that you will be responsible for managing your finances well. You would not take charge of rude remarks. That would be to take the blame or accept responsibility for, depending on the context.
    You take charge of things by being responsible for them, but it is not always the right expression to use. Now I have confused myself and will take the blame for confusing you.
    Thank you for your explanations on taking charge. Your explanations showed how it would or would not combine with other words (collocation).
    If take charge is not the right expression to use, which is the right expression to use? Thanks again for your help.
    Later
    C.
     

    tomandjerryfan

    Senior Member
    English (Canada)
    The Spanish concept of "take charge" has many variants in English. The most correct variant would depend on the context, so it's difficult to give a straight answer.
     
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