Take: Chess / Checkers

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

I'd like to know if the use of "take" in the context "game of chess/ checkers" sounds correct/idiomatic. Please take a look.

1. He took my king and won. - game: chess
2. You might take three pieces in a row.[ in a row = without stopping] - game: checkers


Explanation:

1. He captured my king and won. - game: chess
2. You might capture three pieces in a row. - game: checkers


Thank you very much in advance!
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    ... except that one doesn't actually take the king in chess. The game is won when the king cannot escape from an attack, i.e. checkmate, I believe.

    (The attacker always announces the attack so that the king cannot be taken as a result of inattention of the defender, as is the case with other pieces.)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I agree with Mr Graham: Either "he took my king" or "he captured my king" would be an impossible statement. It would be "he checkmated my king" (or "mated" for short).
     

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    I agree with Mr Graham: Either "he took my king" or "he captured my king" would be an impossible statement. It would be "he checkmated my king" (or "mated" for short).
    Last time I played with my toddler nephew, we have both used the expression 'take the king' (in Spanish). The objective of the game is, certainly, to 'take the king'. According to rules, the game stops just before.

    So, the statement is so 'impossible' as 'The tennis player hit the ball after a double bounce' or 'He won the [informal] match 12-10, 15-13'.

    In 'fast' games (at least in informal games, even among experienced players) those who do not pay due attention can have a nice surprise.
     
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