take every deposition

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Alice.jiang

Member
Chinese
Here's the sentence in a book published in 1984 "The prevailing corporate attitude toward legal work was the doing-everything approach: take every deposition, research every issue to the last degree, use the best firm". What's the meaning of "take every deposition"? Is that used popular today?
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    To take a deposition means to interview someone about a case. If a firm takes every deposition, it means they interview every possible person about a case, even if they're not sure this person's information will be useful. That is an example of "the doing-everything approach."

    The same expression could be used today. It's not popular, but that's not because there is anything wrong with the expression. It's because most writers have few (or no) opportunities to use it.
     

    Alice.jiang

    Member
    Chinese
    Egmont, thanks for your professional and detailed interpretation! So, "take a depostion" is a legal terminology, isn't it?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I'm not Egmont, but, yes, 'take a deposition' is legal terminology. :)

    We ask you to name the source of every quotation, that is, give the title. I find that the book from which this was taken is Corporate legal departments: strategies for the 1980s by J. Randolph Ayre (1984).

    [Note: A small point that doesn't affect the answer your question: the book confirms that it should be "the do-everything approach."]
     
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