take/have/eat breakfast [BE]

HajiSahib

Banned
Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
Hello

I have read some threads but i don't find my answer.

Which one is more common in England english...
Take breakfast
Have breakfast
Eat breakfast


I eat/take/have breakfast at 7:30 am dialy.


Thank you..
 
  • HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    In British English, 'I have breakfast at 7.30am daily' is the most common.
    Thank you sir...
    In what situation should i use eat , in what situation i should use take and in what situation i should use have ?

    Can you please explain for me ?
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    Yes, I can imagine a butler asking 'At what time do you wish to take breakfast milord?'

    The rest of us 'have' breakfast.
    Do you mean only butlers use take with breakfast , not other than butlers ?
    Can you clarify ?
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    That was just a humorous example.
    Sir...if it was just humourous example , what was it meant for ? Why sir heyptesto quoted this ?

    And can you please tell me in which situation i should use have breakfast an in which situation i should use eat breakfast ?

    I am very thankful to you..
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Sir...if it was just humourous example , what was it meant for ? Why sir heyptesto quoted this ?
    He thought you would understand it.
    can you please tell me in which situation I should use have breakfast an in which situation I should use eat breakfast?
    As general guidance (this is NOT a rule - it is guidance)

    Usually it does not matter which you use.

    Eat is less common: use "eat" when you wish to emphasise that you have had some food or spent time eating:
    A: "Would you like a sandwich?"
    B: "No thanks, I have already eaten breakfast."

    "I was eating breakfast when the phone rang."

    A: "You did not run very fast!"
    B: "I know. I have just eaten breakfast."

    Have is much commoner: use have to
    (i) indicate a habit, a regular or frequent occurrence:
    "I usually have breakfast at 9 o'clock but today I didn't have it until 11."
    (ii) in combination with a place:
    "I had breakfast on the verandah this morning - the weather was perfect."
    (iii) in all other circumstances.
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    He thought you would understand it.

    As general guidance (this is NOT a rule - it is guidance)

    Usually it does not matter which you use.

    Eat is less common: use "eat" when you wish to emphasise that you have had some food or spent time eating:
    A: "Would you like a sandwich?"
    B: "No thanks, I have already eaten breakfast."

    "I was eating breakfast when the phone rang."

    A: "You did not run very fast!"
    B: "I know. I have just eaten breakfast."

    Have is much commoner: use have to
    (i) indicate a habit, a regular or frequent occurrence:
    "I usually have breakfast at 9 o'clock but today I didn't have it until 11."
    (ii) in combination with a place:
    "I had breakfast on the verandah this morning - the weather was perfect."
    (iii) in all other circumstances.
    Thank you so much sir... That helps me very much...
    Can you please make another favour ? Can you please give me an example to show how take breakfast is used in British english by upper class...as sir sound shift has mentioned...?
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    I can imagine a butler asking 'At what time do you wish to take breakfast milord?'
    Sir..may i ask what this example meant for ? Why you quoted this sort of example ? What idea you want to give me ?
    I am very thankful if you clarify..
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Sir..may i ask what this example meant for ? Why you quoted this sort of example ? What idea you want to give me ?
    I am very thankful if you clarify..
    As PaulQ said, it was a humorous example of when you might hear 'take breakfast', or a context (upper class or aristocratic) in which it might be said.

    I then went on to say that the rest of us (ordinary people) say 'have breakfast'.

    Can you please give me an example to show how take breakfast is used in British english by upper class...as sir sound shift has mentioned...?
    That was what I did.

    There's no need to call me 'sir'. :)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Can you please give me an example to show how take breakfast is used in British English by the upper class...as sir sound shift has mentioned...?
    When this refers to a regular meal, examples will not help you because you are unlikely ever to have to use the verb to take in this context. Not only is it restricted to the upper classes, it is becoming increasingly rare.
    If you want a "rule", the rule is "You should not used "take breakfast".
    To take, in this sense, means to eat; to drink; to consume, or to {eat and drink}, or to have.

    It exists in normal English in such sentences as:
    "Do you take sugar in your tea?"
    "I take two of these tablets every day."
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    it was a humorous example of when you might hear 'take breakfast
    I am sorry., You did not tell me what idea you were trying to give me by this example...as you know i am learner ...I need to know what a English speaker meant when he gives an example... Can i take the idea by this example that take breakfast is used by butlers in an aristocratic/rich family or a butler at luxurious restaurant when giving offer to a high ranked personality like President , Prime minister etc...i.e., upper class people...
    Please clarify..
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    :thumbsup: Yes. It may not be used by every butler, or every aristocrat, or in every hotel, but it's only in these contexts that you are likely to hear 'take breakfast' nowadays.


    (Note that we always spell the personal pronoun 'I' with a capital letter.)
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    Speaking of 'take' and 'have', while most Americans are somewhat more likely to say 'take' and most British speakers 'have' with words like 'a nap', 'a shower', etc., I'd say both 'take' and 'have' are used in EN-speaking countries. As noted above, though, you should avoid 'take' with the names of meals. You might read take' in scientific papers, eg in a sociology report: "In the (name of tribe studied), the midday meal is usually taken at 2 pm."
     
    Last edited:

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    :thumbsup: Yes. It may not be used by every butler, or every aristocrat, or in every hotel, but it's only in these contexts that you are likely to hear 'take breakfast' nowadays.


    (Note that we always spell the personal pronoun 'I' with a capital letter.)
    Thank you....
    Which one is more common in British english these days

    Eat breakfast or have breakfast ?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    You were given the answer to that question in post 2, HajiSahib.

    Also, you'll find several previous threads if you put eat have breakfast into the Dictionary and thread title search box: eat have breakfast.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    In British English, 'I have breakfast at 7.30am daily' is the most common.
    "I have breakfast at 7.30 am every day." is equally common (in the US, at least). I also don't think anyone would feel the need to specify 'am', although workers on the night shift might specify "I have/eat breakfast at 7:30 pm.".
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Ain'tt, I don't think Rover was commenting on '7am daily', other than to correct the typo in the original post.
    And Rover's bolded and italicised British English was of course responding to HajiSahib's 'England english'.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    Loob, I guess you're right. Anyway, looking back I see PaulQ had introduced "every day" further up in the thread. By the way (and perhaps a bit-off-topic), do you leave a space between '7:30' and 'am/pm'?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top