Take-on (Football AKA soccer)

ARGMAN

Senior Member
Arabic
What is a take-on in football (soccer)? I guess it is related to receiving the ball from a pass, but I am not sure!

British mates could help me here I believe :D.

As per pointme.to and caughtoffside it seems to me like it is to dribble. But again, why didn't they just say "dribble"?
 
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  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I haven't seen it used as a noun before - only as a verb.

    "to take someone on" means to engage with them in a contest.

    Do you have a full sentence? Where did you find the phrase? In a newspaper?

    ________________________________________________________________
    take someone↔on2 [no passive] to play against someone in a game or contest; to fight against someone
    to take someone on at tennis
    The rebels took on the entire Roman army.

    oaadonline.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/dictionary/take_1
     
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    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    What is a take-on in football (soccer)? I guess it is related to receiving the ball from a pass, but I am not sure!

    British mates could help me here I believe :D.
    One takes an opponent on. Your opponent takes you on. If you get past your opponent or you pass the ball to someone else then you have succeeded in taking on your opponent. Otherwise you fail. :thumbsdown:

    GF..
     

    ARGMAN

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    It comes as a noun specially in the statistical pages. like this one.

    << Moderator's note:
    Source and relevant information: Squawka.com: "2 Take-Ons & 3 Key Passes: How Juve’s Summer Signing Downed Napoli" Headline of article by Ian Capasso on (Posted on November 11, 2013) >>
     
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    mr cat

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To take someone on in football would mean that one player is trying to get past another, typically in attacking football and often in wing-play. This may be by dribbling the ball but it may simply be hitting the ball past the other player and beating him/her for pace.
    Oh and I've never heard it used as a noun either but no reason I suppose why it can't be.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    What is a take-on in football (soccer)? I guess it is related to receiving the ball from a pass, but I am not sure!

    British mates could help me here I believe :D.

    As per pointme.to and caughtoffside it seems to me like it is to dribble. But again, why didn't they just say "dribble"?
    It's not BE English.

    GF..

    Where does this rubbish come from???? :eek: Fortunately for me, this style of reporting, is outside "my world" of soccer articles... :cool:
     

    4507160

    New Member
    English
    This is an attempt by a player to beat an opponent while maintaining possession of the ball. A successful dribble means the player beats the defender while retaining possession, unsuccessful ones are where the dribbler is tackled.


    What is a take-on in football (soccer)? I guess it is related to receiving the ball from a pass, but I am not sure!

    British mates could help me here I believe :D.

    As per pointme.to and caughtoffside it seems to me like it is to dribble. But again, why didn't they just say "dribble"?
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I've looked at the links and I conclude that in the football context "a take-on" is a journalistic usage - and rather a rare one at that: I've never heard it in conversation (even though I go to football matches) and I've never heard it from a football commentator on television. I would suggest that it's not an important term for learners.
     
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