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bethemasterofenglish

Senior Member
Japanese
Hello,

The following is from The Economist.

"Mr Fredriksen lives in London, holds a Cypriot passport and has a most un-Scandinavian relish for splashing his money about. Mr Rokke used complex financial engineering to turn a rundown shipyard in Oslo into a bustling shopping district. Mr Kjos has taken on Norway’s powerful unions by, for example, basing planes in Spain and using Spanish flight crews. Norwegian Air has been more consistently profitable than its rival, SAS, and gets better ratings for service."

Then, what does the sentence "Mr Kjos has taken on Norway’s powerful unions by, for example, basing planes in Spain and using Spanish flight crews." mean?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    To take on something or someone means to challenge its power, or their power. In this case, rather than basing (stationing) the aircraft of Norwegian Air in Norway, he based them in Spain ... and used Spanish flight crews to fly the planes, rather than Norwegian flight crews.

    By doing this, he has reduced or eliminated the power of the unions to tell him what to do.
     
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