Take somebody to/for breakfast

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RafaelX

Senior Member
Polish
My question here is simple. Let's consider these two sentences:

1: Let me take you to breakfast.
2: Let me take you for breakfast.

Which one is correct? I find it difficult to differentiate. The only clue I have, is that I've read somewhere that we invite somebody to a particular place/event, but we use for when we want to order food/drink. Is that right?
 
  • STINGGUY

    Senior Member
    Español
    Hello rafaelX,
    Your first option is the right one.
    Your second sentence isn't right at all. If you take someone for something, you believe wrongly that they are that thing.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    If you take someone for something, you believe wrongly that they are that thing.
    Not necessarily. "I took my mother for a ride on my motorcycle" does not mean I thought my mother was a ride on my motorcycle.

    "We went out for breakfast" and "I took him to the bar for drinks" are correct, so "Let me take you for breakfast" -- while not the way we would be likely to say it -- is not egregiously wrong, either.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    They are both correct and normal English.
    1: Let me take you to breakfast. Come with me to the place where we will have breakfast
    2: Let me take you for breakfast. C
    ome with me to the place where we will have breakfast. I will pay for it.

    The first could have the same meaning as the second. That would depend on context. If you tell us your intended meaning and the circumstances in which you want to use the sentence it would be much easier to provide a complete reply.
     

    RafaelX

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hello rafaelX,
    Your first option is the right one.
    Your second sentence isn't right at all. If you take someone for something, you believe wrongly that they are that thing.
    What about take somebody for a ride? We obviously don't mean that someone is "a ride", do we? :)
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    If you take someone for something, you believe wrongly that they are that thing.
    So "take for x" always means that we regard y as x and there are no exceptions whatsoever?

    What about take somebody for a ride? We obviously don't mean that someone is "a ride", do we? :)
    No, STINGGUY's statement is wrong. That is only one meaning of 'take somebody for something'.
     

    RafaelX

    Senior Member
    Polish
    They are both correct and normal English.
    1: Let me take you to breakfast. Come with me to the place where we will have breakfast
    2: Let me take you for breakfast. C
    ome with me to the place where we will have breakfast. I will pay for it.

    The first could have the same meaning as the second. That would depend on context. If you tell us your intended meaning and the circumstances in which you want to use the sentence it would be much easier to provide a complete reply.
    I didn't know there is a difference in the "paying" part. :) Well, let's just assume here that I want to invite somebody to go with me, without specifying who pays for what. Which (to/for) should I best use?
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I didn't know there is a difference in the "paying" part. :) Well, let's just assume here that I want to invite somebody to go with me, without specifying who pays for what.
    If you take somebody for a meal you are taking them as your guest. An invitation to eat together would normally be "Let's go to breakfast" - ie 'let us go ..'
    If you say "Let me take you to breakfast" you might mean "let me take you for breakfast".
    If in your hotel you find your aged and feeble aunt sitting in the foyer, you might well say "let me take you to breakfast" meaning that you will give her your arm and support her to the breakfast room.
    If you are in your North American hotel, where breakfast is either an extra or is not available, at a business conference, you might during your evening networking say to a potential client "let me take you to breakfast in the morning". That suggests you're paying. Mind you, you'd probably make a better impression paying for lunch or dinner. :)
     

    RafaelX

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Mind you, you'd probably make a better impression paying for lunch or dinner. :)
    :D Love that part!

    So, are you saying, Andy, that if I wanted to pay for the treat, I should use the preposition for? Is that it? I mean, I'm trying to bear in mind both what you wrote before ("Come with me to the place where we will have breakfast. I will pay for it. ") and the recent post.
     
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    akana

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I feel that both phrases imply that one person will be treating the other.

    I'll take you out for breakfast.
    I'll take you out to breakfast.

    However, I think it's the verb "take" that makes that implication. It could also be that one person will do the driving, but my first assumption would be that that person will be paying. Just my opinion, however.

    Compare to:
    Let's go out for/to breakfast.

    ...which says nothing about who will pay. Each party will likely pay for their own meal.
     
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    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    No; what I think akana is saying, and I agree, is that "I'll take you" means you're paying, and "Let's go out" is just a suggestion that you eat together. The prepositional choice has nothing to do with who's paying.
     

    RafaelX

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I feel that both phrases imply that one person will be treating the other.

    I'll take you out for breakfast.
    I'll take you out to breakfast.

    However, I think it's the verb "take" that makes that implication. It could also be that one person will do the driving, but my first assumption would be that that person will be paying. Just my opinion, however.

    Compare to:
    Let's go out for/to breakfast.

    ...which is neutral as to who will pay.
    I guess it stands in some opposition to what Andy has implied... Don't know what to make of that. :) It would be useful to have one more opinion... Maybe somebody will put hers/his oar in. :)
     

    RafaelX

    Senior Member
    Polish
    No; what I think akana is saying, and I agree, is that "I'll take you" means you're paying, and "Let's go out" is just a suggestion that you eat together. The prepositional choice has nothing to do with who's paying.
    OK, so we've cross-posted again. ;) Well, so now there's 2 to 1!
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I don't think there is much disagreement here. Andygc clearly stated in #4 that "Let me take you to breakfast" and "Let me take you for breakfast" could have the same meaning, depending on context (which you had not provided). He went on to clarify his meaning with some good examples in #10.

    I agree that there are contexts in which "Let me take you to breakfast" can simply be an offer to assist someone into the place where breakfast is being served.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'll take you out for breakfast.
    I'll take you out to breakfast.
    The original sentences were "Let me take you to/for breakfast". You have changed from an invitation to a statement and have added "out". That changes the meaning considerably and you are answering a question that was not asked.
     

    RafaelX

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Andygc clearly stated in #4 that "Let me take you to breakfast" and "Let me take you for breakfast" could have the same meaning, depending on context (which you had not provided).
    Yes, I should have written something describing the situation I had in mind. Yet, after I provided the context, Andy still insisted that:
    It would be better (and normal in my English) to use "for". Your intention is then clear.
    That's why I interpreted it as standing in some contrast to your (akana's and your) posts.

    I'm just trying to get to the bottom of this to/for thing. :)
     

    akana

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    The original sentences were "Let me take you to/for breakfast". You have changed from an invitation to a statement and have added "out". That changes the meaning considerably and you are answering a question that was not asked.
    This is a good point. "Out" has been tossed in every so often throughout this thread, and I didn't notice that the original post lacked it. Its presence does make a difference, contrary to what another poster said.

    "Let me take you to breakfast," strictly speaking, means, "Let me escort you to breakfast."

    As far as, "Let me take you for breakfast"...to me it doesn't sound idiomatic. This may be a regional thing.
     

    RafaelX

    Senior Member
    Polish
    "Let me take you to breakfast," strictly speaking, means, "Let me escort you to breakfast."

    As far as, "Let me take you for breakfast"...to me it doesn't sound idiomatic. This may be a regional thing.
    So maybe it's one of those BrE/AmE differences (Andy is from the UK)? What do you think?
     
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