take someone for granted

Lbmarcus13

Member
English and USA
Moderator note: multiple threads merged to create this one. Please note that this thread is about taking a person for granted. If you're interested in taking a thing for granted, please see: take something for granted. See also here.

Hi,

Comment dit-on en français, "take someone for granted" ?

Merci
 
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  • anangelaway

    Senior Member
    French
    Bonjour !

    [...]

    As for ''take someone for granted'', I would suggest :
    ''prendre/juger quelqu'un avec désinvolture'' ?
    ''être nonchalant vis à vis de quelqu'un'' ?
     
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    pieanne

    Senior Member
    Belgium/French
    As for ''take someone for granted'', I would suggest :
    ''prendre/juger quelqu'un avec désinvolture'' ?
    ''être nonchalant vis à vis de quelqu'un'' ?

    La désinvolture et la nonchalance sont le résultat de prendre "someone/something for granted", mais cela ne traduit pas l'expression, sorry! :)
     

    Violet Green

    Senior Member
    English. Ireland
    Selon le contexte, il peut être possible d'utiliser la suggestion de Anangelaway,
    "prendre / juger qqn avec désinvolture ou nonchalance."

    On peut aussi paraphraser l'idée ainsi :
    "ne pas se rendre compte des qualités de quelqu'n"
    "ne pas apprécier qqn à sa juste valeur"
    ou
    "être aveugle aux qualités de qqn"...

    Dans le cadre des relations familiales ou amicales, si quelqu'un me dit "you're taking me for granted",
    je comprends
    "tu ne te rends pas compte de tout ce que je fais pour toi".
     

    Zoolbia

    Member
    English
    Bonjour,

    comment dit-on en francais:

    His family takes him and his money for granted.

    My attempt: Sa famille prend lui et son argent pour aquis

    Je sais qu'il y a un thread sur ce sujet, mail il n'a pas m'aide.


    Merci!
     

    Sorrent

    New Member
    French / France
    Hi,

    I think you could use : prendre quelqu'un pour acquis. There has to be a more "elegant" way to say it but I can't think of it right now. Sorry!
     

    sowhat

    New Member
    english canada
    The correct translation would be "tenir pour acquis" . "prendre pour acquis" is not French, it is an english calque.
     

    Mike Arrow

    New Member
    France - French
    "Prendre quelque chose avec désinvolture" is correct, but sounds a little mannered.
    I have had this case in the sentence : "Don't take them for granted" (it is about someone, not something)

    I have translated it with: "Ne les prenez pas à la légère"/"Ils ne sont pas à prendre à la légère".

    I sincerely hope this will help.
     

    patgaret

    Senior Member
    Switzerland, French
    My collins dictionnary gives this:
    to take somebody for granted = considérer quelqu'un comme faisant partie du décor
     

    catwithnohat

    Member
    USA English
    "take for granted" is very hard to translate. there's a few threads on it. (you find them by searching 'grant.')

    is often translated as "prendre pour acquis" but I don't think that works with the context here (talking about friends.) you might have to say it a different way -- she doesn't appreciate her friends...
     

    A day in Eireann

    Senior Member
    France - French
    "take for granted" is very hard to translate. there's a few threads on it. (you find them by searching 'grant.')

    is often translated as "prendre pour acquis" but I don't think that works with the context here (talking about friends.) you might have to say it a different way -- she doesn't appreciate her friends...


    Indeed, not an easy one. Usually the French have to decide which part of the two inherent aspects of "taken for granted" they will enhance:

    you can say "prendre pour acquis" for friends, but it always sound a bit too formal for friends. This way describes the fact that where you take something or someone for granted, you consider that this something will always be as it is (for events, benefits) or that you "deserve" to have them and it's impossible for your friends to be thinking otherwise, whatever you do.

    or you can use "considérer ses ami(e)s comme faisant partie du décor ". In which case you highlight the fact that you do your own things, not taking their wishes and beliefs into consideration. And it's a bit more casual.

    There isn't a case of a one and only, perfect wording in this case, sorry.
     

    hirondelled'hiver

    Senior Member
    Si "prendre quelque chose pour acquis" (un concept, un sentiment) est correct, "prendre une personne pour acquise" ne se dit pas. Par contre, dans le cas d'amis, on peut contourner la difficulté en disant par exemple:
    penser que son/leur amitié nous est acquise (sous§entendu, on ne fait rien pour l'entretenir).

    Personnellement, je trouve que l'expression "considérer ses amis comme faisant partie du décor" manque de clarté, le sens ne saute pas aux yeux lorsqu'on l'emploie, et l'expression est encore plus bizarre si on a "take his family for granted".
    Croire que l'amitié nous est acquise - ou qu'elle va de soi - serait une tournure plus correcte. C'est l'idée qu'on ne fait rien pour entretenir l'amitié, et qu'on estime qu'elle nous est forcément due quoiqu'on fasse, comme l'a dit A-day-in-Eirann.
    Dans le cas de la famille, la traduction est plus ardue.
    Peut-on traduire par "savoir qu'on peut toujours compter sur sa famille"? (ça marche aussi avec les amis).
     

    ocid

    Senior Member
    France French
    elle ne remet pas en question ses relations avec ses amis (c'est l'idée mais c'est un peu long...)
    elle ne s'intérroge pas sur la qualité de ses relations avec ses amis (encore plus long!!)
     

    vanagreg

    Senior Member
    France, French
    In some other contexts "to take for granted" can be translated as "prendre pour argent comptant", but that doesn't fit here.

    I can't find right now an expression in French for that.

    I would use here the word "condescendance" to describe the behaviour she expects her friend to have towards her, such as compelling with her desires.

    Elle attend de ses amis une certaine condescendance
     

    francois_auffret

    Banned
    France, French
    how would this be said in french

    Thinking about it, I came to the conclusion that you have no such expression in French... However, the closest translation I have found would be:

    Elle croit que ses amis seront toujours là

    or

    Elle croit que ses amis ne l'abandonneront jamais

    I am expecting some feedback from francophone people here to tell me if it is not that bad...
    However, these won't convey all the meanings implied in the English expression...

    :confused:
     

    francois_auffret

    Banned
    France, French
    Just two remarks concerning previous postings in this thread...

    As far as my humble knowledge is concerned, prendre pour acquis is not a French expression at all, whether you use it for things or for anything else.... it is a literal translation from English. In French, if there is any expression with acquis, it is il m'est acquis for instance, if you had to translate the above English expression, you would say:

    Elle croit que ses amis lui sont acquis

    But I think this expression isn't really the same in French and English...

    Condescendance on the other hand means condescension, and it is defined as: "supériorité bienveillante mêlée de mépris" (Petit Ro')... Be careful then...

    No offence meant, :), Errare Humanum Est and most of all...

    CORRECT ME IF I AM WRONG....
     

    vanagreg

    Senior Member
    France, French
    Just two remarks concerning previous postings in this thread...

    As far as my humble knowledge is concerned, prendre pour acquis is not a French expression at all, whether you use it for things or for anything else.... it is a literal translation from English. In French, if there is any expression with acquis, it is il m'est acquis for instance, if you had to translate the above English expression, you would say:

    Elle croit que ses amis lui sont acquis

    But I think this expression isn't really the same in French and English...

    Condescendance on the other hand means condescension, and it is defined as: "supériorité bienveillante mêlée de mépris" (Petit Ro')... Be careful then...

    No offence meant, :), Errare Humanum Est and most of all...

    CORRECT ME IF I AM WRONG....

    Condescendance has this meaning too, but it also means what I explained: "Complaisance qui amène à céder aux sentiments, aux désirs d'autrui." (according to cnrtl.fr)

    So it's to give in somebody's will, desires, fancies, etc.

    I believe taking somebody for granted means to have them accept your ways, am I wrong?

    So the propositions :
    Elle croit que ses amis seront toujours là
    Elle croit que ses amis ne l'abandonneront jamais

    are not bad, and I would propose in addition:

    elle compte trop sur ses amis
    elle profite indûment de ses amis
     

    francois_auffret

    Banned
    France, French
    Condescendance has this meaning too, but it also means what I explained: "Complaisance qui amène à céder aux sentiments, aux désirs d'autrui." (according to cnrtl.fr)

    So it's to give in somebody's will, desires, fancies, etc.

    I believe taking somebody for granted means to have them accept your ways, am I wrong?

    So the propositions :
    Elle croit que ses amis seront toujours là
    Elle croit que ses amis ne l'abandonneront jamais

    are not bad, and I would propose in addition:

    elle compte trop sur ses amis
    elle profite indûment de ses amis


    Condescendance had more or less the meaning you mentioned... more than a century ago... The only meaning of condescendance in Modern present day French is the one I mentioned... Moreover, in the past meaning you mention of this word, an idea of 'coming down to someone's level is included' ('S'abaisser au niveau d'autrui par complaisance') which is included in the word ('descend-')... Check the Petit Ro', if you like...

    Your translations are not bad... I would suggest that you just mix the both of them this way to get a better third one:

    Elle compte indûment sur ses amis
     

    honeybfly

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    I have to make you jealous from time to time, otherwise you'll take me for granted.
    Je dois te rendre jaloux des fois, sinon tu me tiendras pour acquis.

    Est-ce que j'ai bien traduis 'take me for granted' dans cette phrase ? Je ne suis pas sur.

    Merci d'avance.
     

    pbx

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Des fois is not French (although broadly in use), there is even a Facebook group against « des fois, je vais au coiffeur ». You should say de temps en temps or parfois.

    Tu me tiendras pour acquis is probably not what I would use spontaneously but, you know what it is, I cannot find better for the moment…

    OK, maybe tu me considèreras comme acquis(e).
     
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    pifnane

    Senior Member
    French - France
    ... sinon tu croiras que c'est arrivé (colloquial), que c'est dans la poche (more colloquial), sinon tu croiras que je suis à toi une fois pour toutes.
    Better : (imho) tu ne feras plus (tu feras moins) attention à moi,
    cheers
     

    Moon Palace

    Senior Member
    French
    More explicit: 'sinon tu ne chercheras plus à me séduire'
    or
    'sinon tu me considéreras comme partie intégrante de ta vie'.
     

    vanagreg

    Senior Member
    France, French
    The first part is not what would be said naturally, but rather:

    Il faut bien que je te rende jaloux de temps en temps

    As for the second part, I propose:

    sinon tu me considéreras comme ta chose/ton objet.
     

    vanagreg

    Senior Member
    France, French
    It's true I couldn't really find a good equivalent for the time being, it's really not easy. If I find a better one, I shall not fail to post it :)

    But what about the first part, it's more suitable, isn't it?
     

    aliseb

    Member
    English - American
    J'aime bien la 1ère partie. J'aime bcp l'idée proposée par pifnane "c'est dans la poche", mais je trouve qu'il manque un truc. Comment rendre cela clair, pour bien indiquer que c'est la femme qui est soi-disant "dans la poche"?
     

    janleedo83

    New Member
    french
    There are many ways to translate this sentence into french , but i would like to come up with this idea:

    " Il ne fait pas le tiers de ce que ses amis font pour lui"

    It is hard to translate but i remember the day when i came across something like this , that day i spent much time than i could have imagined .
     

    joyeux86

    New Member
    Hello I am writing my wedding vows in French.
    How would I say
    " I promise never to take you for granted"
    I can't figure out how to do it.. Should I transform the phrase to something like, "Je te promets de t'apprecierai toujours"
    Thanks!
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Literally you will say :
    Je te promets de ne jamais te prendre pour acquis.
    That's very literal and it sounds like a calque to me (and it sounds a bit like some bank language :D) (but maybe it's just me)

    Maybe you could say:
    "Je te promets de ne jamais te considérer comme acquis(e)"
    (yes, very similar I agree).

    I think there must be something better :)

    edit: "acquis" if your fiancé is a man / "acquise" if your fiancée is a woman.
     
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    chambers

    Senior Member
    français - French
    My collins dictionnary gives this:
    to take somebody for granted = considérer quelqu'un comme faisant partie du décor

    I like your translation because to me, "To take somebody for granted" means "you" expect that someone will always be THERE when you need THEM, and never show them any special attention or thank them. For example : "He spends all his time at work and takes his wife for granted".

    Il passe tout son temps au travail et ne fais pas de cas de sa femme (phrase formelle)
    Il passe tout son temps au travail et ne se rend pas compte de tout ce que sa femme fait pour lui.
    Il passe tout son temps au travail et traite sa femme comme si elle n'existait plus (ou comme si elle faisait partie du décor).

    As always, we need to know the context to choose a suitable translation.
     

    Locape

    Senior Member
    French
    'Ne me considére pas comme acquis(e)' ou 'comme faisant partie du décor' n'est pas la même chose que 'je ne suis pas ton esclave' ou 'ta boniche'. Il y a un (ou plusieurs) degré(s) de différence dans le reproche et l'exaspération !
     

    tartopom

    Senior Member
    French
    Peut-être Croire que quelqu'un est à notre disposition.
    Elle croit que ses amis sont ( toujours ) à sa disposition. / Tu crois que je suis ( toujours ) à ta disposition ?
     
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    ForeverHis

    Senior Member
    American English
    Why not just stick with " ne pas apprécier qqh/[qch] à sa juste valeur"? It's kind of long, but it captures the thought perfectly.
     

    iuytr

    Senior Member
    french
    " ne pas apprécier qqh/[qch] à sa juste valeur"
    Not exactly the same for me . " Ne pas apprécier qqh/[qch] à sa juste valeur" is to underestimate , you could use it for somebody you don't interact with, when i understand "take someone for granted" as a close relation you are so used to that you don't even think it could stop or you should give something in return or just say thank you/ i love you etc ...
     
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