take someone out for (a) dessert

EdisonBhola

Senior Member
Korean
Hi all, I know that "dissert" is uncountable when it means cakes and ice-cream in general terms, and countable when referring to specific dissert. But in the following context, is it preferable to "a dissert" or simply "dissert"?

Yesterday Uncle Same took me out for (a) dissert.

Many thanks! :)
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Normally, I think we would say "dessert" without the article. But I don't see the article being incorrect.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    We (I?) normally only use "dessert" to refer to the sweet course of a meal.

    If I don't want to specify what I ate or drank (ice-cream, cream cake or whatever), I would say that My uncle took me out to a patisserie/cafe (for a treat).
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    We have restaurants devoted to desserts in Asia – Honeymoon Desserts in Hong Kong quickly comes to mind. So it's not uncommon to have dinner in one restaurant, and go to a dessert restaurant for dessert.
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    To "take someone out" is slang for to kill them, and that's how I read your sentence. How can you still be posting?

    Besides taking someone out for something, there's to something. Uncle Sam took me out to a ballgame.
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    In BE we can say "X took me out" without people thinking of hitmen.

    I sometimes take my grandchildren out, to give their parents a break.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It would never enter my head that “Uncle Sam took me out” could mean anything other than a social trip. Apart from the obvious fact that a dead person cannot give an account of their own ending, it’s not a context I meet in daily life. On the other hand taking people out for social events absolutely IS a routine expression.

    I suspect srk watches too much telly. He should get out more :D
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    in the following context, is it preferable to "a dissert" or simply "dissert"?
    Yesterday Uncle Same took me out for (a) dissert.
    The reason both are correct is "took me out for" means "went with me to eat". Since you can say both "eat dessert" (an activity) or "eat a dessert" (eat one dessert), you can use both in this sentence.

    Note: In AE the expressions "take her out" and "go out with her" usually refer to dates (romantic social events). If the sentence just mean "went somewhere with someone socially", we usually add a destination or a purpose:

    I took the kids out to the playground. (here "out" means "out of their home")
    I took the kids to the playground. (same meaning)
    I took my sister out for lunch.
    I took Lucy out. We went to a movie. (a date)
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    If a woman said "John took me out on Saturday" I would definitely understand it as "out on a date".

    (Unless she followed it with, "My funeral is on Wednesday.")
     

    nh01

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Thanks for all the replies.

    If the sentence just mean "went somewhere with someone socially",
    If I want to just mean "go somewhere with someone socially", what are my other options of phrases including "out" apart from "take somebody out"? Thanks.
     
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