take something for granted

layman9

Senior Member
vietnamese
Hi,

Can you tell me what sentence is correct?

1. We've become so complacent sometimes, taking it for granted the efforts that the other people spends to always be, and look his/her best

2. We've become so complacent sometimes, taking the efforts that the other people make to always be and look his/her best for granted

Thank you very much for your help.
 
  • Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    You can put "for granted" in either position, but without "it". I prefer the position of "for granted" in the first sentence; in the second sentence it's too far from "take".

    We use "it" only as a "dummy object" when followed by "that" and a complete clause:
    You mustn't take it for granted that I will help you.

    Another correction: "people" is plural, so not "his/her" but "their".
     

    layman9

    Senior Member
    vietnamese
    Thank you very much. I appreciate your help a lot.

    Can I rewrite it like:

    We've become so complacent sometimes, taking for granted the efforts that the other people make (or spend) to always be, and look their best.

    Is it correct now?
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Just three small corrections:
    "other people": you're speaking generally, so without "the".

    "to always be and look their best", with no commas, or "to always be, and look, their best" with two commas. You can consider "and look" as a non-essential addition, between two commas, or as an essential part of the sentence, without commas.

    "make" not "spend".
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I do not like the combination of the present perfect "we have become" with "sometimes." Either we have become complacent, and are complacent all the time, or we are sometimes complacent, but are not complacent at other times.

    < Off topic comments removed. Cagey, moderator >
     
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