take the war

redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
A handful of monsters remained free, in desolate regions, but no large forces and no organized bands. Then the English took the war to Moore's Wall, leaving enough constructs behind to guard the land they had retaken

Source: Timepiece, Heather Albano
Background: The monster had taken over almost half of the country and terrorized people wherever they passed, until the invention of constructs tipped the scale back in the English's favor. The constructs, giant iron robots piloted by three soldiers each, helped the English dislodge most of the monsters and regain most of the ground they had previously lost. It was only a matter of time before they completely wiped out the hopeless remnants.

Hi, does "take the war" simply mean "carry the war over to Moore's Wall"? Is it only used in contexts where one was directing the ongoing war to a different location?" Would you use it to mean "start the war" ?
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The expression "take the war to" indicates an advance into a new theatre of operations. In this case they have advanced to Moore's Wall to carry on fighting there. Also commonly seen as "to take the war to the enemy" which would mean a change from defence to offence. It cannot be used to mean "to start a war".
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    I appreciate your help Andygc. I did a search for "take the war to" and it is mostly used in contexts of , as you put it aptly, advancing into a new theatre of operations
     
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