Take to a bit

HuskBlom

Banned
Spanish - Spain (EU)
Hi everyone

I've just stumbled upon this particular sentence during a listening task:
"Nowadays art is not seen as just one of those things we may, or may not, take to a bit at school" Would it be like "dismiss"?

What meaning does that expression add to the sentence? Is it British English?

Thanks
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Yes, I understand that. However, if you've now read the thread on "take to something," do you understand what "take to" means here? If not, please tell us what is still confusing you. If you understand what "take to" means, but don't understand how it can be qualified by "a bit," then please tell us that, too.
     

    HuskBlom

    Banned
    Spanish - Spain (EU)
    Hi again Florentia.
    do you understand what "take to" means here?
    No, I don't understand it. I've read the thread whose link you have provided, but I'm still confused...
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Here is the relevant definition, from post #3 of the linked thread, quoting the WR dictionary:

    to begin to like: They took to each other at once.

    In your sentence, we may begin to like art, a bit, when we are exposed to it at school.
     
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