Take to the sky

Holmboe

Member
Italian
Janis sings :
"One of these mornings
You’re gonna rise, rise up singing,
You’re gonna spread your wings,
Child, and take, take to the sky,
Lord, the sky. "

I didn't find the proper meaning of "to take to " in this "wordreference".but I presume is similar to "to take off toward the sky"

Dont'you think , mates?
 
  • TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Hi Holmboe,

    Yes, it can mean "take off toward the sky".

    "Take to" in this context means to "Go (up) into".

    So perhaps something like "salire al cielo"...(?)
     

    baldpate

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Googling "salire al cielo" many of the references seem to be directly religious (like "Per Gesù salire al cielo significa salire in croce"), where it obviously means "ascending into Heaven", referring to the assumption of Christ; others seem to have a figurative sense deriving from, or related to, that (but obviously, I haven't checked all 20,000 :) !).

    I wonder if an Italian speaker could comment on this point?

    In the Gershwin song, I think the sense is more that associated with a bird spreading its wings and taking flight/wing for the first time, when it is old enough. You need a 'poetical' way of saying that :)

    Boh!
    "levarsi verso l'alto" ??
    "liberarsi dalla terra" ??
     

    Holmboe

    Member
    Italian
    may be "librarsi verso il cielo"

    the italian verb "librarsi " is more poetical than the others , whereas "salire al cielo" in italian reminds christian origin , definately
     

    Le Renard

    Senior Member
    Take to the sky is literally what birds do when they lift off from the ground and begin flying. Metaphorically, it can refer to the moment the baby birds begin to leave the nest and make their life on their own. So, it can also mean to gain your independence, to begin making your own decisions in life, being responsible for your life, even physically leaving home. Or, when a project has been in the planning and preparation stages, and then the moment comes for it to start functioning, it "takes off" or "takes to the sky". I hope this is helpful.
     

    MR1492

    Senior Member
    English -USA
    The lyrics come from an old spiritual from the early, post-slavery days of African-Americans. So, it is talking about spreading ones angelic wings and heading to heaven. My Italian isn't good enough to know how to phrase that one but it does have a religious meaning.

    Phil
     

    Starless74

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    For future readers' reference, it's the aria Summertime, from Gershwin's opera Porgy And Bess, which has later become a jazz standard and was eventually covered by Janis Joplin (see OP) in the late 60's.
    It's important to note that many lyrics from that libretto contain slang and/or ungrammatical expressions which mimic the non-american origins of the black slaves, such as: it ain't necessarily so, I wants to stay here or I loves you Porgy.
    I'm not implying that take to the sky is ungrammatical at all in this context, but since the authors intentionally wanted the characters to often use phrases differently from what one may expect to hear from a native speaker, it may well be one of those cases.
    (Sorry for my poor English :p)
     

    MR1492

    Senior Member
    English -USA
    For future readers' reference, it's the aria Summertime, from Gershwin's opera Porgy And Bess, which has later become a jazz standard and was eventually covered by Janis Joplin (see OP) in the late 60's.
    It's important to note that many lyrics from that libretto contain slang and/or ungrammatical expressions which mimic the non-american origins of the black slaves, such as: it ain't necessarily so, I wants to stay here or I loves you Porgy.
    I'm not implying that take to the sky is ungrammatical at all in this context, but since the authors intentionally wanted the characters to often use phrases differently from what one may expect to hear from a native speaker, it may well be one of those cases.
    (Sorry for my poor English :p)
    That's exactly right, Starless, thanks for the correction. I would still say that the lyrics are about death and ascension into heaven.

    Phil
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I would still say that the lyrics are about death and ascension into heaven.
    Uh, I don't think so Phil. In Porgy and Bess it's sung as a lullaby. Don't you cry, your daddy's rich and your momma's good lookin'...
    One of these mornings
    You're going to rise up singing
    Then you'll spread your wings
    And you'll take to the sky


    You've got everything working in your favour and one of these days you're going to shine, is how I'd interpret it.

    Starless is correct but it remains, in my humble opinion and apparently some other much more able to discern than me, that these are lyrics written by a white man in the 30s.
    When (Toni Morrison) received the Nobel prize in Stockholm in 1993, the American soprano Barbara Hendricks sang Gershwin's Summertime, but Morrison refused to applaud what she regarded as the inappropriate use of a patronizing dialect in the lyrics.
     

    Starless74

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Starless is correct but it remains, in my humble opinion and apparently some other much more able to discern than me, that these are lyrics written by a white man in the 30s.
    Yes, of course. I didn't want to delve too much into exegesis herein. :)
    I also agree that the aria, as it was concieved, has little to do with spiritual ascension, let alone ascension to the heavens after death.
     
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