take turns Ving day by day/ day after day/ every day

JJJenifer

Senior Member
Taiwan/Chinese
Dear all,

I am trying to introduce students about Japanese calendar.
Below is the sentence:

On Japanese calendars, we often can find six words <-----Japanese words removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->

1. They take turns showing day by day.
1' They take turns being shown day by day.

2. They take turns showing day after day.
2' They take turns being shown day after day.

3. They take turns showing every day.
3' They take turns being shown every day.

Which is the most idiomatic?

If none of them are idiomatic, could you please write idiomatic sentence(s)?

Thank you in advance.
Jennifer
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    It's not clear what you want your sentence to mean. Can you explain, using other words, what you are trying to say?

    Also, which of your six versions of the sentence do you think is best?
     

    JJJenifer

    Senior Member
    Taiwan/Chinese
    Thank you, Florentia52.

    It is similar to the cycle of the seven days in a week, but there are only six in the Japanese cycle.

    For example,
    the first word is shown on Jan.1,
    the second word is shown on Jan.2,
    the third word is shown on Jan.3
    the fourth word is shown on Jan.4
    the fifth word is shown on Jan. 5
    the sixt word is shown on Jan.6
    the first word is shown on Jan.7
    the second word is shown on Jan.8.

    For me, I think they all seem quite ok...
    But I am not confident of my English ...

    Sorry, I think maybe I should have asked like
    "Are they all correct sentences? If not, could you please tell me which is/are wrong?" :)
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I would say that none of your sentences idiomatically convey what you're trying to say, as Florentia52 said above. They're unclear.

    If I were asked how to convey what is happening, I might say:

    "Japanese calendars cycle through these six words the way Gregorian calendars cycle through the days of the week."

    To use "take turns" here is not the best choice. We would never say the days of the week "take turns."
     

    JJJenifer

    Senior Member
    Taiwan/Chinese
    Thank you, Truffula.

    Aha! It seems like "take turn" can not be used in a sentence with a subject which can not think or have willing...

    However, I am still curious if "take turn" can work with day by day/day after day/every day...

    If I change a bit,
    1. They take turns taking care their mother day by day.
    2. They take turns taking care their mother day after day.
    3. They take turns taking care their mother every day.

    Are they all correct sentences? If not, could you please tell me which is/are wrong?

    Thank you in advance.

    Jennifer
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Do you mean that "they" are two people? If so, they care for her on alternate days.

    You could just say that they take turns caring for her, but we wouldn't know whether that was a weekly or monthly arrangement. To avoid an unnecessarily unwieldy sentence, "On alternate days" is good.
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I found a few, not many, citations of uses of "day by day" with "take turns"

    Advent 2009 "Once again this year we are marking the season of Advent with a series of reflections, day by day we will take turns sharing a thought, and image or a prayer as we travel through this time of preparation together."

    Magic's Elfrid Payton is making progress with his shooting stroke "Coach Scott Skiles said his assistant coaches — Adrian Griffin, Monte Mathis, Mario Elie and Conner Henry — will take turns coaching the Magic's main summer league team, rotating day by day. "

    Using "day after day" like this is not common enough for me to find any examples.
    Using "every day" is very common. It is probably the best choice.

    So to summarize:
    1) "day after day" is not used this way with "take turns"
    2) "day by day" is rarely used this way with "take turns" but it does occur
    3) "every day" is commonly used this way with "take turns"

    My own choice of most natural would be "each day" though.


    Friends carry UGA grad with muscular dystrophy up Appalachian Trail "Day by day, groups of five or more people would take turns carrying Carden Wyckoff on their backs." * I originally thought this was an example of what Jennifer was asking about, but on consideration I think it means something different here - it means the same as "day after day" would, which is that this taking turns carrying Carden Wyckoff happens on many days in a row.
     
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    JJJenifer

    Senior Member
    Taiwan/Chinese
    Thank you, velisarius,
    Because of your answer, I've learned how to use the word "alternate". :)
    But I meant more than two. There are six...

    Thank you again, Truffula,
    With your examples, I think I should have used "rotate" but not "take turns" in my original question.
    The six words rotate every day/ day by day/ each day.

    As to the sentence "Day by day, groups of five or more people would take turns carrying Carden Wyckoff on their backs.",
    I've read it all, and I've known the article is about a nice hike, which was a week long and I think "taking turns carrying Carden Wyckoff" happened seven days in a row.

    So do you mean a week is not long enough for using "day after day" or "day by day"?
    If so, does couples of months work better with "day after day" and "day by day"?

    If I misunderstood something, I am sorry very much.

    Thank you for your patience in advance.
    Jennifer
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I'm sorry, also. I think I just didn't explain it very well.

    What I think they mean by "Day by day, groups of five or more people would take turns carrying Carden Wyckoff on their backs." is this:

    On the first day, five people each carried Carden for a short time, then let someone else carry her, and so on. Later in the story it says "Although most people could only make it five or 10 minutes, they all pitched in." So people were taking turns carrying Carden for maybe only 10 minutes each turn, maybe an hour, not a whole day.

    And, day after day, via the process of taking turns that lasted a short time, they proceeded along the trail. In this case, I think "day by day" meant "day after day" - whose meanings you can see here: Day after day definition and meaning | Collins English Dictionary
     

    JJJenifer

    Senior Member
    Taiwan/Chinese
    Thank you very much, Truffula,
    This time I've got it :)

    None of "Taking turns + every day/ day by day/ day after day" mean people do the things regularly by the frequency as a day.

    So, does "rotate +every day/ day by day/ day after day" make the idea of "people do the things regularly by the frequency as a day" clear?
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Thank you very much, Truffula,
    This time I've got it :)

    None of "Taking turns + every day/ day by day/ day after day" mean people do the things regularly by the frequency as a day.

    So, does "rotate +every day/ day by day/ day after day" make the idea of "people do the things regularly by the frequency as a day" clear?
    Well, 'taking turns every day' often means the frequency is one day, if not always. And 'taking turns day by day' can mean that the frequency of change of turn is one day, it just doesn't always. In my first (Advent 2009) quote, I think it meant that. In the Carden Wycliff quote, it didn't.

    Almost always, "rotate every day" means the frequency is 1 day, same for "rotate each day" - though in a context where it's made clear, it could mean "spend some time rotating every day" actually.

    Definitely "rotate day after day" does not mean rotate with a frequency of 1 day; it means continue rotating (at unspecified frequency, or maybe continuously) for many days in a row.

    Sometimes, depending on context, "rotate day by day" means one and sometimes it means the other.
     

    JJJenifer

    Senior Member
    Taiwan/Chinese
    Thank you very much, Truffula!:thumbsup:
    With your clear and patient explanations, I think I've found the best for the meaning I wanted to transfer :):idea:
     
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